Friday, September 26, 2003

Empire editorial: The proposal to protect permanent fund has merit
A new proposal put forth by the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees to add protections to the fund was endorsed Wednesday by Governor Murkowski. The trustees' proposal is designed to guarantee that there will be a fund for future generations of Alaskans by setting a limit on how much of the fund could be paid out annually and by adding inflation-proofing safeguards.

Empire editorial: Hudson ideal choice for permanent fund board
Distinguished, long-time Juneau State Rep. Bill Hudson was selected by Governor Murkowski to serve a four-year term on the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation (APFC) Board of Trustees. Hudson served for 14 years in the Legislature, and worked very hard right down to his final days in office to find solutions to the state's fiscal problems. The announcement was made at the annual meeting of the Permanent Fund Corporation in Anchorage on Wednesday night.

Empire editorial: The proposal to protect permanent fund has merit
A new proposal put forth by the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees to add protections to the fund was endorsed Wednesday by Governor Murkowski. The trustees' proposal is designed to guarantee that there will be a fund for future generations of Alaskans by setting a limit on how much of the fund could be paid out annually and by adding inflation-proofing safeguards.

Empire editorial: Hudson ideal choice for permanent fund board
Distinguished, long-time Juneau State Rep. Bill Hudson was selected by Governor Murkowski to serve a four-year term on the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation (APFC) Board of Trustees. Hudson served for 14 years in the Legislature, and worked very hard right down to his final days in office to find solutions to the state's fiscal problems. The announcement was made at the annual meeting of the Permanent Fund Corporation in Anchorage on Wednesday night.

Attack on middle class
I fear the real agenda both here in Alaska's administration and in the Bush White House is to pauperize America's middle class.

Land swap a terrible deal
On Saturday I attended Sen. Lisa Murkowski's town meeting on Senate Bill 1354. The proposed bill will give up to 12,000 acres of land in Berners Bay to the Cape Fox and Sealaska corporations in exchange for 3,000 acres of their mostly clearcut lands near Ketchikan, plus some subsurface rights. At the meeting I was shocked to see a map of the land in Berners Bay to be traded away. It is nearly 19 square miles of very high-value land, including over nine miles of oceanfront on Berners Bay and Lynn Canal.

Thanks to friends for helping during fire
I would like to thank my good friends and neighbors, Jim and Dor-e Demers, for their excellent response during a recent fire.

Swap really a rip-off
Dear Senator Murkowski: I am writing to you today regarding S. 1466, the Alaska Land Transfer Acceleration Act. As a commercial fisherman and 20-year resident of Southeast Alaska, I have followed issues related to the Tongass National Forest closely. I have witnessed various proposals by the Alaska delegation in Washington, D.C., to effect changes to forest management. Each time we the American public were told, without exception, that such an approach is needed to stimulate the local economy. Upon closer scrutiny, however, these proposals invariably favor corporations singularly bent on liquidating natural resources, owned by the American public, for the benefit of their private shareholders.

Thanks to Max Mertz
Thanks to Max Mertz for his My Turn column shining a bright light on the dismal job that the present School Board leadership has done planning its budgetary priorities. As an auditor privy to the details of wastefulness at the Juneau School District, he knows better than most what the priorities of the present board have been and how we have come to this contract crisis with Juneau's teachers.

Paying the costs in Iraq
When I hear presumably intelligent politicians bemoaning the purported lengthy time it is taking to transfer government in Iraq to the people, I have cause to wonder.

Seeking sensible laws
Recently Alaska Attorney General Gregg Renkes announced that the state would ask the Alaska Court of Appeals to rehear the case of David Noy. On Aug. 29 the Court of Appeals overturned Mr. Noy's conviction for possession of marijuana, apparently for his personal use.

Peters says he can offer the school board leadership
William Peters, a credit union executive and former Juneau Chamber of Commerce president, says he would bring strong leadership to the Juneau School Board. He's one of 12 candidates for five open seats on the board.

Raid leads to roundup of suspected illegal aliens
A downtown drug bust Tuesday that turned up 20 grams of cocaine led federal authorities to 19 allegedly illegal aliens in the Juneau area. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Mike Milne told the Empire from his Seattle office Wednesday the bust also led agents to one Mexican citizen who appears to be in the country legally.

Glory Hole cuts afternoon hours
For the last year and a half, John Covington, a homeless man living in Juneau, has frequented the downtown soup kitchen the Glory Hole during the day for a hot meal and some camaraderie. But beginning next month, he and the others who rely on the facility will have to find a new place for shelter and meals during the day. Earlier this week, the Glory Hole announced that due to a budget shortfall it will close its doors in the late morning and afternoon.

Tourist business grew late in season
Tour operators and retail stores that cater to cruise ship passengers in Juneau don't know how much money they made this summer. But one thing is certain, according to one manager in the industry: "They all made money," said Frank Rich, a manager with Mendenhall Glacier Transport, which operates shuttles and tours between downtown and the Mendenhall Glacier. "Whether or not they made as much as they did last year, I don't know. We'll know that at the end of the year. But everybody makes a living."

Williams says he's well-versed in financing projects
Dave Williams says he offers the Juneau School Board his experience putting three children through the local public schools, as well as a business degree, experience in financing construction projects and familiarity with financing for health and social services.

ACS proposes rate changes
Alaska Communications Systems will attempt to even phone rates around the state and bring residential rates on par with those around the country with rate changes its proposing to the Regulatory Commission of Alaska this fall, said Mary Ann Pease, vice president of corporate communications for ACS. For residents of North Pole and Fairbanks, residential rates would go down. For Juneau residents, ACS residential rates for local calls would increase by slightly less than $3 a month, from $9.42 to $12.25.

Morris says she's concerned about student outcomes
Julie Morris, a certified teacher who has been an activity therapist in the local schools, says she's running for the Juneau School Board because she wants to serve. Morris is one of 12 candidates for five open positions on the board. She ran last year and placed third in the race for two open seats.

Around Town
Around Town is a listing of local nonprofit events.

Around Town
Around Town is a listing of local nonprofit events.

Police & Fire
Reports from Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers.

Story familiar with schools as a parent and volunteer
Andrea "Andi" Story, a volunteer in the schools and a mother of three schoolchildren, says she would bring knowledge and a parent's perspective to the Juneau School Board.

Candidates in Oct. 7 election face JDHS students' questions
Juneau-Douglas High School students want to know whether teachers will get raises, why a second high school will be built and why the city supports a third lane on the Douglas Bridge, among other issues. On Wednesday morning, students from history and government classes questioned candidates for the Juneau Assembly and Juneau School Board in the school commons. They rotated among the candidates, who came and went as their schedules allowed.

'03 dividend totals $1,107
The Alaska Permanent Fund dividend is $1,107.56, several hundred dollars less than last year, Gov. Frank Murkowski said Wednesday night. Eligible Alaskans will receive $443.20 less than they did from last year's dividend of $1,540.76.

Assembly looks at more money for Valley school
The Juneau Assembly on Oct. 13 will consider adding at least $1.628 million to the budget for the planned high school at Dimond Park in the Mendenhall Valley, Assembly members said Wednesday. Seven of the nine Assembly members met as a Committee of the Whole on Wednesday afternoon. Dale Anderson and Jim Powell were absent, and Stan Ridgeway was present by telephone for part of the meeting.<

Osama in Alaska? Tabloid says bin Laden's here; troopers say they're 'on it'
The Weekly World News claims to have found the world's most-wanted terrorist. Osama bin Laden - perhaps embarrassed by his habitual bed-wetting, or seeking a scenic backdrop for his new reality show - is occupying a love nest in Alaska. Bin Laden "is living with Eskimos somewhere in Alaska and has taken an Eskimo bride to help conceal his identity," according to the nationwide newspaper, generally considered the most outrageous of the nation's supermarket checkout-stand tabloids.

Photo: Past fast ferry, 1982
A jetfoil ship, built by Boeing, cruises Gastineau Channel at high speed in August 1982. The ship, brought to Alaska as a fast-ferry demonstration project, sailed Southeast waters for tests, but no ships were ordered. Promoters billed its runs as flights, not sailings.

Mayron says problem solving is one of her strengths
Megan Mayron says she fixes problems for a living and would like to apply that expertise to the Juneau schools. Mayron is one of 12 candidates competing for five open seats on the Juneau School Board.

FYI
Births, judgments and other legal matters

Police & Fire
Reports from Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers.

Pot prop may go on '04 ballot
Pro-marijuana advocates got a boost this week when Anchorage Superior Court Judge John Suddock ordered Lt. Gov. Loren Leman to accept almost 200 initiative signature booklets rejected in January on "trivial rule violations." The initiative, which would decriminalize private use of marijuana for those 21 and older, could make it on the ballot for the 2004 general election, if certified by the Division of Elections.

Photo: Historical swimmers
This 1910 photograph shows 11 male swimmers from Treadwell dressed in early 20th-century swimming attire. The Treadwell Mine complex included a variety of recreation options for miners and their families, including a natatorium for indoor swimming.

Photo: Save the sand dollars
Esther Bower, 10, left, and Maggie Dunlap, 9, install a sign Tuesday near Sandy Beach in Sitka. The girls were concerned about the welfare of sand dollars and decided to start a campaign to inform the public.

Corrections
Corrections of local stories

Photo: Golden carpet
Ashley Solo, a sixth-grader at Floyd Dryden Middle School, races along the Treadwell Trail, carpeted in cottonwood leaves Thursday afternoon. About 100 middle school students participated in the 11/2-mile race.

Schorr offers years of school board experience
Alan Schorr, who has continuously served on the Juneau School Board since 1991, said he brings experience as a policy-maker to the position.

Baxter and Kerr to marry
Michelle Baxter of Auckland, New Zealand, and Jeremy Kerr of Juneau will be married Sept. 27, 2003, at the Shrine of St. Therese in Juneau. The couple plans on residing in Juneau.

LaMere and Carpenter marry
Carrie Anne LaMere of Crown Point, Ind., and Keith David Carpenter of Juneau were married on June 27, 2003, at St. Mary Catholic Church in Crown Point, Ind. A reception immediately followed at the historic Hall of Justice in Crown Point where John Dillinger broke out of jail.

Pets of the Week
Pets available for adoption

Teacher Talk: How one teacher sees the year
Ever since elementary school I have visualized a year as a slightly warped clock. If you take a simple round clock off the wall and spin it like a coin, gravity will eventually take hold. Just before it comes to a stop it will sit suspended in air about 30 degrees from horizontal. A year always appears like this in my head. It doesn't spin but this third dimension helps me to appreciate the rise and fall of time. Since becoming a teacher, the fluid movement of energy now punctuates the scale of my visual year.

House and Judson to wed
Lisa House and Ken Judson of Juneau will be married at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4, 2003, at Skater's Cabin in Juneau. A reception will follow the ceremony.

Neighbors Digest
A digest of community events

Thank You: To Ms. Scott for returning my case
I want to thank you very much for return of an eyeglass case lost on Flight 60 a few days ago.

SEAtrails receives $454,813 for trail maps, promotional materials
SEAtrails received $454,813 in the 2003 Omnibus Appropriations Act under the Public Lands Highways Discretionary Program and has entered into an agreement with the Western Federal Lands division of the Highway Administration and the U.S. Forest Service Alaska Region.

Hibernating for the winter
I want to thank publisher Don Smith and former editor Steve Reed of the Juneau Empire for allowing "On the Waterfront" to appear as a weekly column for the last several months. When I first started, I told them that if they didn't like a particular story to just tell me and I'd send in another one. It is up to the publisher and editor to decide what appears in a newspaper. It is a gift to a writer or a columnist to be able to submit his stories. But in the course of the year they haven't changed a word, or even a punctuation mark.

Photo: Birds-eye view
The Mendenhall Wetlands are exposed at low tide in this aerial view from Sept. 2002. The Juneau Airport and Egan Drive are at center right, with Fritz Cove, Auke Bay and the Chilkat Mountains visible in the distance.

Vivian M. Kahklen
Lifelong Alaskan and former Juneau resident Vivian M. Demmert Kahklen, 85, died Sept. 18, 2003, in Eagle River. Her Tlingit name was Kasteech.

William 'Billy' Aceveda
Former Juneau resident William "Billy" Aceveda, 49, died Sept. 22, 2003, in Anchorage.

Sue E. Shields
Former Juneau resident Sue E. Shields, 97, died Sept. 12, 2003, in Anchorage at the Providence Horizon House.

Empire editorial: The proposal to protect permanent fund has merit
A new proposal put forth by the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation Board of Trustees to add protections to the fund was endorsed Wednesday by Governor Murkowski. The trustees' proposal is designed to guarantee that there will be a fund for future generations of Alaskans by setting a limit on how much of the fund could be paid out annually and by adding inflation-proofing safeguards.

Learning about the whole, wide world
L et's encourage the citizens of Juneau to be aware of global issues and conditions. It is important that our students understand world events, recognize the impact of international issues, and acknowledge the relationships among cultures. Our young people benefit from being taught to show respect for others while being curious and friendly.

Empire editorial: Hudson ideal choice for permanent fund board
Distinguished, long-time Juneau State Rep. Bill Hudson was selected by Governor Murkowski to serve a four-year term on the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation (APFC) Board of Trustees. Hudson served for 14 years in the Legislature, and worked very hard right down to his final days in office to find solutions to the state's fiscal problems. The announcement was made at the annual meeting of the Permanent Fund Corporation in Anchorage on Wednesday night.

My Turn: Government and religion partners for social change
By any objective measure, the social welfare system of the past 40 years has fallen short of its original purpose. During this time, the United States spent more than $7 trillion on human service programs, yet saw a rise in illegitimate births of 500 percent; an increase in violent crime rates of 300 percent; and a tripling of the number of children on welfare rolls.

Alaska high school football standings
Football standings through games of Sept. 20

Crimson Bear swimmers, spikers hit the road this weekend
The Juneau-Douglas High School swim and volleyball teams will hit the road this weekend, but in different directions. The swim team will be heading north to Fairbanks as the Crimson Bears head outside Region V for the first time this season. Juneau will swim at North Pole on Friday and against West Valley in a dual meet at Lathrop on Saturday.

Alaska swimming top 16 prep times
Alaska's top 16 times for the 2003 high school swimming season.

State awaits Bear runners
The Juneau-Douglas High School boys and girls cross-country teams are heading into Saturday's state meet in Palmer under very different circumstances. The Crimson Bear boys are traveling north as a marked team, after the squad won the Palmer Invitational - the state's premiere regular-season meet - earlier this month. That victory, accomplished on the same trails as the state championship, squarely placed the Juneau boys on the map as a state contender.

Sports in Juneau
Sports in Juneau is a service provided by the Juneau Empire to provide information on upcoming sports and outdoors events in Juneau.

Sports in Juneau
Sports in Juneau is a service provided by the Juneau Empire to provide information on upcoming sports and outdoors events in Juneau.

State football playoff scenarios
The different state playoff possibilities for the Cook Inlet Football Conference teams after this weekend. So far, only Chugiak has clinched a state berth while Service and Bartlett have been eliminated. This list does not include the results of Service's non-conference game tonight in Medford, Ore.

Postseason picture muddled going into final game
There are eight possible playoff scenarios that could emerge this weekend from the final Cook Inlet Football Conference games of the regular season, and some of them seemingly take a degree in rocket science to figure out the different tie-breaking formulas. But for the No. 5 Juneau-Douglas High School football team - who play the top-ranked Chugiak Mustangs at 3 p.m. Saturday at Chugiak High School - the playoffs can be simplified to four words.

This Day in History
This day in Alaska; in the nation; in the world.

This Day in History
This day in Alaska; in the nation; in the world

UAF announces new journalism endowment
The University of Alaska Fairbanks has established the C.W. Snedden Chair in Journalism, an endowment that is expected to bring a nationally recognized print journalist to the Interior. The endowment is funded by a donation from Helen Snedden, the widow of C.W. Snedden, former publisher and owner of the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner.

Man attacked by bear, tapes wounds, drives to hospital
A hunter bitten by a grizzly bear bound some of his wounds with duct tape, then rode his all-terrain vehicle to his pickup truck and drove himself to the hospital. Bill Murphy, 54, was bitten on his shoulder, thigh and buttock in the attack Sept. 17. He had surprised a grizzly cub and its mother on the Permanente trail north of Sutton, which is about 50 miles northeast of Anchorage.

Alaska Digest
News from around the state

Alaska Digest
News from around the state

Human skull found along Matanuska R.
A human skull found along the Matanuska River has been identified as the remains of a Knik woman reported missing five years ago, Alaska State Troopers said Wednesday. The state medical examiner identified the skull Tuesday as that of Susan Beth Crawford, who was 46 years old when she was last seen Aug. 9, 1998, around Mile 89 of the Glenn Highway. Her abandoned car was found one day later near Mile 91.

Fairbanks diocese settles sex abuse case
The Diocese of Fairbanks has reached a settlement with one of six plaintiffs in a sexual abuse lawsuit. The plaintiff, identified as John Doe, accepted an offer of $30,000 and attorney fees to end his case involving the Rev. Jules Convert, who has since died.

Did whaling cause decline in sea otters?
A cascading decline in seal, sea lion and sea otter populations in the North Pacific may have been triggered by industrial whaling after World War II that forced packs of killer whales to look for new sources of food, a group of scientists suggest. "If our hypothesis is correct, either wholly or in significant part, commercial whaling in the North Pacific Ocean set off one of the largest and most complex ecological chain reactions ever described," the scientists wrote in an article appearing this week on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Web site.

Shemya testing bypassed in defense plan
Thorough testing will not be conducted on radar on Shemya Island before its deployment in a national missile defense system, a congressional agency said this week. Critics of President Bush's plan to launch a missile defense system by late 2004 said the agency's report shows the administration's goal is unrealistic. Supporters said the lack of a radar test shouldn't be used as an excuse to hamper development of the system.

If it thinks like a duck, what does that mean?
A nimal thought intrigues University of Alaska Southeast philosophy professor Kevin Krein.

Deering, Down: A 20-year art project
One night in 1983 at a recording studio in Tulsa, Okla., Skagway musician Rev. Neil Down made an acquaintance that changed his life - musically and otherwise. He was working on a speculation session, never released, for Capital Records. In an adjoining studio were Dick Sims, a keyboard player for Eric Clapton, and Henry McCullough, a former guitarist for Paul McCartney's Wings and Joe Cocker's Grease Band. McCullough also was the lone Irishman to play at Woodstock.

The opportunities are limitless - until the interview
I was in the corner office, seated in the interview chair. I had folded my arms across my chest early, and now they were pinned there like I was wearing an anxiety straitjacket. My interviewer, a gruff, unimpressed editor, paged hastily through my resume. "Oh, Smith College, huh," he said, glancing over the education portion. "That looks like a useless degree."

Movies: Where & When
Movies showing at local theaters.

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