Slideshow | 'Klaska' - Klas Stolpe's take on Alaska

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A brown bear on the shore.
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Clad in a traditional Norwegian sweater, a young lad peers into a small tidal pool during 17th of May festivities in Petersburg.
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Whale boat captain Herman Ahsoak spots for polar bear on the sea ice off of Barrow. Ahsoak is one of, roughly, 57 whaling captains in Barrow. The International Whaling Commission allows Barrow Inupiat to strike and harvest 21 whales per year. It is a part of cultural traditions passed down through generations and the harvest is shared among the community.
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An Alaskan brown bear overturns rocks in search of food. Touted as the world's largest land carnivore (meat eaters), they are really omnivores (using a variety of foods). Brown bear will feed on barnacles and small fish trapped under rocks by the receeding tide and they actually spend more time eating grass, plants and berries than meat. Salmon is an important part of their diets. They are known to chase down a moose or can exhibit canibalistic behavior as well.
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A brown bear ranges for food along a southeast Alaska beach.
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Chief Shakes Tribal House on Chief Shakes Island in Wrangell.
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A retired Petersburg High School shop teacher mowed this design into the marsh grasses at his cabin up the Stikine River. Alaska Airlines jets would point out the design to passengers as they made their approach at the airport.
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The tour boat Adventure Bound moves near a calving off the face of the Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness area off Stephens Passage. The fjord is 30 miles long and 15th is covered in ice and is a major tourist destination in Southeast Alaska.
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A Sitka Black-tail deer in a Southeast muskeg.
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A Sitka Black-tail deer on a southeast Alaska beach at low tide.
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An eagle perches on an ice berg.
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Just an eagle.
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Devils Thumb, or Taalkhunaxhk'u Shaa in Tlingit, in the Stikine Icecap region of the Alaska-British Columbia border. In Tlingit it means "the Mountain That Never Flooded" and is believed to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (the great flood). The Mountain's Northwest Face has never been successfully climbed and three teams have died trying. The Northwest Face rises 6,700 feet from the Witches Tits peaks at the base to the summit at an average angle of 67 degrees. It is the biggest rock face in North America. The conditions are never "In face," that is, three different sections of the climb are never in the same conducive state for climbing. The East Ridge is attempted by only advanced mountain climbers. Jon Krakauer succeeded on the East in 1977 and his account can be found in his book Eiger Dreams.
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A common honeybee pollinates orange hawkweed in southeast Alaska. Honeybees account for over 80% of all insect pollination as well as provide humanity with Pollen (one of the richest and purest natural foods), Honey (an easily digestible, pure food with antibacterial qualities), Beeswax (used in drugs, cosmetics, artists' materials, furniture polish and candles), Propolis (a health aid, and basis for fine wood varnishes), Royal Jelly (commands premium prices rivaling imported caviar, and is used by some as a dietary supplement and fertility stimulant), and Bee Venom ("Bee venom therapy" is widely practiced overseas and by some in the USA to address health problems such as arthritis, neuralgia, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even MS).
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A sealion class is in session along a southeast shoreline.
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Ice calved away to show an impressionistic rendering of Edvard Munch's "The Scream," or so I interpreted. Munch was Norwegian by the way.
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Just liked the different stylings of icebergs.
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A hermit crab sits on the railing of a boat in an area of Duncan Canal in Wrangell Narrows south of Petersburg.
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A full summer moon over Devils Thumb across Frederick Sound from Petersburg.
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Me looking through my "protection" rifle to spot polar bear for photo shots on the sea ice where the Chukchi Sea, Beaufort Sea and Arctic Ocean waters combine off of Barrow.
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A crazy English buddy of mine who simply had to kayak along the face of a very large glacier.
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Outside of Hoonah, a tour boat anchors in front of an old clear cut to unload passengers. Hoonah has survived the reduction of logging and fishing interprises by adapting to the tourism industry.
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Tony Hanson blasts off the face of Twin Creeks Ridge during Petersburg's first annual Muskeg Winter Madness games.
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An assortment of 'hoochies' and other commercial troll gear await a chance to catch salmon from the back of the FV Osprey in the Petersburg boat harbor.
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The silhouette of a rower is dwarfed by mountains in Tracey Arm.
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The terminus of the LeConte Glacier, the southernmost active tidewater glacier in the Northern hemisphere, in September. Due to the 810-foot deep water in the bay the glacier calves instead of advancing, resulting in spectacular 'shooters' and bergs. Considered stable today the glacier has retreated 2.5 miles since first charted in 1887. Petersburg High School students began measurements of the glacier in 1983 results show the glacier generally moves forward in the spring after the cold winter weather decreases melting. In the fall, after warmer summer temperatures, it retreats. Roughly 21 miles long and one mile wide the LeConte Glacier rests at the head of the LeConte Glacier Bay, a 12-mile fjord carved out of the coastal mountain range over thousands of years. The bay is a breeding, birthing, and rearing area for harbor seals. LeConte Glacier is one of the few remnants of the vast ice sheets that covered much of North America during the Pleistocene age.
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Calving at the LeConte Glacier, the southernmost active tidewater glacier in the Northern hemisphere, in September. Due to the 810-foot deep water in the bay the glacier calves instead of advancing, resulting in spectacular 'shooters' and bergs. Considered stable today the glacier has retreated 2.5 miles since first charted in 1887. Petersburg High School students began measurements of the glacier in 1983 results show the glacier generally moves forward in the spring after the cold winter weather decreases melting. In the fall, after warmer summer temperatures, it retreats. Roughly 21 miles long and one mile wide the LeConte Glacier rests at the head of the LeConte Glacier Bay, a 12-mile fjord carved out of the coastal mountain range over thousands of years. The bay is a breeding, birthing, and rearing area for harbor seals. LeConte Glacier is one of the few remnants of the vast ice sheets that covered much of North America during the Pleistocene age.
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Stuart "Bucky" Eddy walks across an ice flow at the LeConte Glacier wearing authentic Viking brown bear hides while celebrating the 17th of May Little Norway Festival in Petersburg Alaska. The annual event attracts visitors world-wide. The festival began in 1958 to honor the town's settling by Norwegian fishermen in 1910. Petersburg is named after Norwegian immigrant Peter Buschmann who started a cannery there in the 1890s.
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Just a goat above Juneau.
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Baby ducks hide in the coastal foilage at Sealion Cove on Kruzof Island.
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Sea urchins are shown at low tide on a Southeast Alaska beach.
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Native masks are displayed on British Columbia carver's boat anchored in Warm Springs Bay.
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The Northwest Face of Devils Thumb, Cats Ears Spire and Witches Tits. Devils Thumb, or Taalkhunaxhk'u Shaa in Tlingit, in the Stikine Icecap region of the Alaska-British Columbia border. In Tlingit it means "the Mountain That Never Flooded" and is believed to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (the great flood). The Mountain's Northwest Face has never been successfully climbed and three teams have died trying. The Northwest Face rises 6,700 feet from the Witches Tits peaks at the base to the summit at an average angle of 67 degrees. It is the biggest rock face in North America. The conditions are never "In face," that is, three different sections of the climb are never in the same conducive state for climbing. The East Ridge is attempted by only advanced mountain climbers. Jon Krakauer succeeded on the East in 1977 and his account can be found in his book Eiger Dreams.Alaska-British Columbia border. In Tlingit it means "the Mountain That Never Flooded" and is believed to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (the great flood). The Mountain's Northwest Face has never been successfully climbed and three teams have died trying. The Northwest Face rises 6,700 feet from the Witches Tits peaks at the base to the summit at an average angle of 67 degrees. It is the biggest rock face in North America. The conditions are never "In face," that is, three different sections of the climb are never in the same conducive state for climbing. The East Ridge is attempted by only advanced mountain climbers. Jon Krakauer succeeded on the East in 1977 and his account can be found in his book Eiger Dreams.
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A glacier leading to mountains along the Alaska and British-Columbia border.
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The Northwest Face of Devils Thumb, or Taalkhunaxhk'u Shaa in Tlingit, in the Stikine Icecap region of the Alaska-British Columbia border. In Tlingit it means "the Mountain That Never Flooded" and is believed to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (the great flood). The Mountain's Northwest Face has never been successfully climbed and three teams have died trying. The Northwest Face rises 6,700 feet from the Witches Tits peaks at the base to the summit at an average angle of 67 degrees. It is the biggest rock face in North America. The conditions are never "In face," that is, three different sections of the climb are never in the same conducive state for climbing. The East Ridge is attempted by only advanced mountain climbers. Jon Krakauer succeeded on the East in 1977 and his account can be found in his book Eiger Dreams.Alaska-British Columbia border. In Tlingit it means "the Mountain That Never Flooded" and is believed to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (the great flood). The Mountain's Northwest Face has never been successfully climbed and three teams have died trying. The Northwest Face rises 6,700 feet from the Witches Tits peaks at the base to the summit at an average angle of 67 degrees. It is the biggest rock face in North America. The conditions are never "In face," that is, three different sections of the climb are never in the same conducive state for climbing. The East Ridge is attempted by only advanced mountain climbers. Jon Krakauer succeeded on the East in 1977 and his account can be found in his book Eiger Dreams. "Cat's Ears Spire" can be seen to the right and then Witches Tits.
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An Orca jumps from the waters of Stephens Passage outside Yankee Cove between Douglas and Admiralty Island. The largest member of the Dolphin family, Orca, or killer whales, live from 50-80 years in the wild, are between 23-32 feet and can weigh over 6 tons. Killerwhales are carnivores resident Orca pods, those which stay in local waters, feed mainly on fish while transient pods seem to target marine mammals.
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BRRRRRR. On a glacier approaching Devil's Thumb.
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Sandhill Cranes fly low over Petersburg. Flocks of the migrating fowl, Alaska's largest game bird (adults reach heights of three feet tall with a wingspan of six feet), can fly at over 28,000 feet. Flocks should be visible during the coming weeks as they return from southwest wintering grounds and rest at stops such as Sand, Hill, and Crane Lakes and Petersburg Lake. Cranes usually arrive at their nesting grounds in early to mid-May and nest on wet tundra, marshes, and muskegs.
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A harbor seal rests on a September ice floe in the LeConte Glacier, the southernmost active tidewater glacier in the Northern hemisphere. Due to the 810-foot deep water in the bay the glacier calves instead of advancing, resulting in spectacular 'shooters' and bergs which make excellent seal habitat. Considered stable today the glacier has retreated 2.5 miles since first charted in 1887. Petersburg High School students began measurements of the glacier in 1983 results show the glacier generally moves forward in the spring after the cold winter weather decreases melting. In the fall, after warmer summer temperatures, it retreats. Roughly 21 miles long and one mile wide the LeConte Glacier rests at the head of the LeConte Glacier Bay, a 12-mile fjord carved out of the coastal mountain range over thousands of years. The bay is a breeding, birthing, and rearing area for harbor seals. LeConte Glacier is one of the few remnants of the vast ice sheets that covered much of North America during the Pleistocene age.
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Twisted! A youth breaks through back country powder on a snow machine.
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Sun breaks over a mountain in southeast Alaska to illuminate the muskeg's winter chill.
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A curious seal pokes his head up from the ice flow at LeConte Glacier outside of Petersburg. Hundreds of seal give birth to their young in the safety of the ice fields in LeConte Bay.
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A little Viking boy at Petersburg's Sandy Beach.
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Harbor seals rest on an ice floe in the LeConte Glacier, the southernmost active tidewater glacier in the Northern hemisphere, in September. Due to the 810-foot deep water in the bay the glacier calves instead of advancing, resulting in spectacular 'shooters' and bergs. Considered stable today the glacier has retreated 2.5 miles since first charted in 1887. Petersburg High School students began measurements of the glacier in 1983 results show the glacier generally moves forward in the spring after the cold winter weather decreases melting. In the fall, after warmer summer temperatures, it retreats. Roughly 21 miles long and one mile wide the LeConte Glacier rests at the head of the LeConte Glacier Bay, a 12-mile fjord carved out of the coastal mountain range over thousands of years. The bay is a breeding, birthing, and rearing area for harbor seals. LeConte Glacier is one of the few remnants of the vast ice sheets that covered much of North America during the Pleistocene age.
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The sun sets before the path of a commercial fishing boat in northern waters of Frederick Sound in Southeast Alaska in Septembe.
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Two Trumpeter Swans on the water of Blind River Rapids on Mitkof Island in Southeast Alaska near Petersburg in February seem to carve a Valentine heart in the thin ice layer on the waters surface as they feed.
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Herring seiners set their nets during the Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery in Deep Inlet and Aleutkina Bay outside Sitka Alaska. Fishers try to catch tons of herring to reach the guideline harvest level (GHL) in "openers" from 20 minutes to a few hours long.
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Swans swim in the breakup of March.
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Trumpeter swans take to flight in the waters of Blind River Rapids near the Tongass National Forest during snowfall on Mitkof Island in southeast Alaska.
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Three swans stand watch in the Blind River Rapids on Mitkof Island.
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Low light and low flying swans
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Approaching Devils Thumb with Witches Tits and Cat's Ear Spire to the left. Devils Thumb, or Taalkhunaxhk'u Shaa in Tlingit, in the Stikine Icecap region of the Alaska-British Columbia border. In Tlingit it means "the Mountain That Never Flooded" and is believed to have been a refuge for people during Aangalakhu (the great flood). The Mountain's Northwest Face has never been successfully climbed and three teams have died trying. The Northwest Face rises 6,700 feet from the Witches Tits peaks at the base to the summit at an average angle of 67 degrees. It is the biggest rock face in North America. The conditions are never "In face," that is, three different sections of the climb are never in the same conducive state for climbing. The East Ridge is attempted by only advanced mountain climbers. Jon Krakauer succeeded on the East in 1977 and his account can be found in his book Eiger Dreams.
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A harbor seal pokes his head up from an ice floe in the LeConte Glacier, the southernmost active tidewater glacier in the Northern hemisphere, Monday September 22. Due to the 810-foot deep water in the bay the glacier calves instead of advancing, resulting in spectacular 'shooters' and bergs which make excellent seal habitat. The bay is a breeding, birthing, and rearing area for harbor seals. LeConte Glacier is one of the few remnants of the vast ice sheets that covered much of North America during the Pleistocene age. Considered stable today the glacier has retreated 2.5 miles since first charted in 1887. Petersburg High School students began measurements of the glacier in 1983 results show the glacier generally moves forward in the spring after the cold winter weather decreases melting. In the fall, after warmer summer temperatures, it retreats. Roughly 21 miles long and one mile wide the LeConte Glacier rests at the head of the LeConte Glacier Bay, a 12-mile fjord carved out of the coastal mountain range over thousands of years.
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Walrus in the waters off of Round Island.
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A natural growing bouquet of wild Alaskan wildflowers.
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The Tribal House on Chief Shakes Island in Wrangell.
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Vikings and Valkyries at Petersburg's Little Norway, or 17th Of May, Celebration... or what we Swedes refer to as "run fast, or lay low, or get out of town" day.
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A waterfall at Warm Springs Bay just off Chatham Strait on Baranoff Island.

Description

Empire photographer Klas Stolpe has photographed Alaska for many years. These images are some of his favorites.

All photos by Klas Stolpe / Juneau Empire. 

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