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Today In Sports History

Posted: July 23, 2013 - 12:02am
FILE - In this July 4, 1939, file photo, New York Yankees' Lou Gehrig wipes away a tear while speaking during a tribute at Yankee Stadium in New York. Delivering one of the most hallowed speeches in baseball history, Lou Gehrig spoke between games of a doubleheader with the Washington Senators on July 4, 1939. It came two weeks after he had retired having been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (AP Photo/Murray Becker)  Murray Becker
Murray Becker
FILE - In this July 4, 1939, file photo, New York Yankees' Lou Gehrig wipes away a tear while speaking during a tribute at Yankee Stadium in New York. Delivering one of the most hallowed speeches in baseball history, Lou Gehrig spoke between games of a doubleheader with the Washington Senators on July 4, 1939. It came two weeks after he had retired having been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (AP Photo/Murray Becker)

July 23

1907 — Australasia beats British Isles 3-2 to win the Davis Cup held at Wimbledon. Australasia wins its first David Cup and ends the four-year reign of the British Isles.

1921 — At the annual Harvard-Yale vs. Cambridge-Oxford meet at Harvard Stadium, Harvard’s Edward Gourdin becomes the first to long jump 25 feet. Harvard lists Gourdin’s jump as 25 feet, 3 inches, but the official listing in U.S. Track and Field is 25-2.

1925 — Lou Gehrig hit the first of his major league record 23 grand slams as the New York Yankees posted an 11-7 triumph over the Washington Senators.

1930 — Pie Traynor won both ends of a doubleheader for the Pittsburgh Pirates with home runs. In the first game, Traynor homered in the ninth and in the second game, he connected in the 13th.

1944 — Bill Nicholson of the Chicago Cubs hit four home runs in a doubleheader split with the New York Giants. Nicholson hit a home run in the opener, which the Cubs won 7-4. He hit three straight in the second game, but the Giants won 12-10. In that game, Nicholson was walked with the bases loaded in the seventh inning.

1960 — Betsy Rawls becomes the first woman to win the U.S. Women’s Open golf title four times.

1964 — Bert Campaneris of Kansas City hit two home runs in his first major league game. He homered on the first pitch off Minnesota’s Jim Kaat, and then connected again in the seventh to lift the Athletics to a 4-3 win.

1966 — John Pennel pole vaults 17 feet, 6¼ inches for the world record in a meet at Los Angeles. It’s the eighth of nine world records he set in the event in his career and his first since 1963.

1974 — Write-in starter Steve Garvey of the Los Angeles Dodgers singled and doubled to lead the NL to a 7-2 victory over the AL in the All-Star game at Pittsburgh.

1976 — The last NFL All-Star game is held and is shortened when thunderstorms hit Chicago. The Pittsburgh Steelers beat the All-Stars 24-0.

1978 — Hollis Stacy wins the U.S. Women’s Open golf championship for the second straight year.

1984 — Kansas City’s Dan Quisenberry registered his 200th career save as the Royals beat the New York Yankees 5-2. Quisenberry reached the 200-save plateau in his 409th appearance, the quickest in major league history.

1989 — Mark Calcavecchia wins the British Open, edging Greg Norman and Wayne Grady in a three-man playoff. Calcavecchia, the first American to win the Open in five years, birdies three of the four holes in the playoff.

1989 — Greg Lemond wins his second Tour de France with the closest finish ever, edging Laurent Fignon by 8 seconds. Lemond starts the day 50 seconds behind Fignon and wins the final stage, a 15-mile race against the clock from Versailles to Paris, in 26:57. Fignon finishes the stage 58 seconds slower.

1995 — John Daly wins the British Open at St. Andrews by four strokes in a four-hole playoff with Italy’s Costantino Rocca. Rocca forces the playoff by sinking a 65-foot putt on the 18th hole.

1995 — Miguel Indurain of Spain wins his record fifth consecutive Tour de France. Indurain joins Jacques Anquetil, Eddy Merckx and Bernard Hinault as the other five-time winners.

2000 — Tiger Woods, at 24, becomes the youngest player to win the career Grand Slam with a record-breaking performance in the British Open on the Old Course at St. Andrews. Woods closes with a 3-under 69 for a 19-under 269 total, the lowest score in relation to par at a major championship.

2000 — Ryan Klesko hit a game-tying solo homer in the ninth inning and a two-run shot in the 10th to lift San Diego over Colorado 6-4.

2002 — Nomar Garciaparra homered three times on his 29th birthday, connecting twice in a 10-run third inning and then hitting a grand slam in the fourth inning of Boston’s 22-2 win over Tampa Bay.

2006 — Tiger Woods, one month after missing the cut for the first time in a major, becomes the first player since Tom Watson in 1982-83 to win consecutive British Open titles.

2006 — Floyd Landis, pedaling with an injured hip, cruises to victory in the Tour de France, keeping cycling’s most prestigious title in American hands for the eighth straight year.

2007 — Alex Rodriguez singled home Johnny Damon in the ninth inning of the New York Yankees’ 9-2 win over Kansas City to become the first player to reach 100 RBIs this season and the first player to reach the milestone in fewer than 100 team games since Manny Ramirez in 1999. The last Yankees to do it were Joe DiMaggio and Lou Gehrig in 1937.

2009 — Mark Buehrle pitched the 18th perfect game in major league history, a 5-0 win over Tampa Bay. It was the first since Randy Johnson’s on May 18, 2004. Buehrle threw 76 of 116 pitches for strikes and fanned six in his second no-hitter — the first coming on April 18, 2007, against Texas.

2009 — Mark Buehrle pitches the 18th perfect game in major league history, a 5-0 win over Tampa Bay.

2011 — Boston’s Terry Francona earned his 1,000th win as a major league manager, the 57th to reach that milestone, and the eighth still active. The Red Sox beat Seattle 3-1, sending the Mariners to their club record-tying 14th consecutive loss.

2012 — Penn State is all but leveled by penalties handed down by the NCAA for its handling of the allegations against former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. The NCAA imposes an unprecedented $60 million fine, a four-year ban from postseason play and a cut in the number of football scholarships it can award.

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