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Ultimate flying disc more than frisbee

Posted: October 4, 2013 - 8:15am
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Frisbees were flying last Saturday as Juneau teams faced off during an Ultimate Frisbee Tournament, held at the Dimond Park Fieldhouse and sponsored by the Juneau Empire. The winning un-named team consisted of Hugh Carey (captain), Corey McKrill, Sarah Bronstein, Marcus Narvaez, Jessica Porter, David Job, Chip McMillan and Susie Kendig. Four teams competed in the event.   Photos courtesy of Juneau Ultimate
Photos courtesy of Juneau Ultimate
Frisbees were flying last Saturday as Juneau teams faced off during an Ultimate Frisbee Tournament, held at the Dimond Park Fieldhouse and sponsored by the Juneau Empire. The winning un-named team consisted of Hugh Carey (captain), Corey McKrill, Sarah Bronstein, Marcus Narvaez, Jessica Porter, David Job, Chip McMillan and Susie Kendig. Four teams competed in the event.

Frisbees were flying last Saturday as Juneau teams faced off during an Ultimate Frisbee Tournament, held at the Dimond Park Fieldhouse and sponsored by the Juneau Empire. The winning un-named team consisted of Hugh Carey (captain), Corey McKrill, Sarah Bronstein, Marcus Narvaez, Jessica Porter, David Job, Chip McMillan and Susie Kendig. Four teams competed in the event.

Ultimate frisbee is a team sport played with a flying disc. The object of the game is to score points by passing the disc to a player in the opposing end zone, similar to an end zone in American football or the in-goal area in rugby. Players may not run with the disc, and must keep a pivot while holding the disc. While originally called ultimate frisbee, it is now officially called ultimate flying disc in many areas because Frisbee is registered as a trademark, albeit genericized, for the line of discs made by the Wham-O toy company. In 2008, there were 4.9 million Ultimate players in the US.

The basic rules of Ultimate are as follows:

The two teams begin at opposite end zones and try to advance the disc to the other end zone. The disc is put into play by one team throwing off to the other team. This throw-off is called the pull. Once in play, the disc may be moved only by passing, so the player holding the disc must stay put (but may pivot on one foot). If a team successfully advances the disc into the end zone, that team scores a point, the teams swap directions, and the team that scored pulls to the other team.

If a pass is incomplete, intercepted, or caught out of bounds, the opposing team immediately gains possession and tries to move the disc in the other direction. Another way to change possession is that the player holding the disc, called the thrower, has a limited time to throw the disc: A defensive player within 10 feet of the thrower may loudly count to 10 (unless counted by the referee), and if the disc is not thrown within 10 seconds, the defense immediately gains possession. This defensive player is called the marker, and the audible count is called the stall count.

Under the professional rules, there are four 10-minute quarters. At the end of four quarters, whoever has the most goals wins. If there is a tie at the end of four quarters, an additional 5-minute OT period is played. If there is a still a tie after the OT period, one point is played and whoever scores wins.

The club game is typically played until an end condition is reached, typically a time limit or when one team reaches a certain number of points.

A professional regulation game features teams of 7 players each, with substitutions allowed between points and during timeouts. A Major League Ultimate regulation field is 120 yards by 53 1/3 yards, including end zones each of 20 yards deep.

A club regulation game features teams of 7 players each, with substitutions allowed between points and during injuries. A USA Ultimate regulation field is 120 yards (110m) by 40 yards (37m), including end zones each 25 yards (23m) deep. In USA Ultimate Club Championship Series (2012) the endzone length was shortened to 20 yards (18m) to allow for consistency with WFDF rules used in international competition and to increase the number of field sites that can be used for ultimate.

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