This Day in History

Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2003

In Alaska

• In 1932, The roundhouse shops of the White Pass Railroad burned at Skagway.

• In 1940, Plans to construct Elmendorf Air Force Base at Anchorage were announced in Washington D.C.

• In 1979, Seventy mph winds and near zero temperatures ravaged Anchorage.

In the nation

• In 1733, English colonists led by James Oglethorpe founded Savannah, Ga.

• In 1809, Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, was born in present-day Larue County, Ky.

• In 1870, women in the Utah Territory gained the right to vote.

• In 1892, President Lincoln's birthday was declared a national holiday.

• In 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was founded.

• In 1915, the cornerstone for the Lincoln Memorial was laid in Washington D.C.

• In 1924, George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" premiered in New York.

• In 1968, "Soul on Ice" by Eldridge Cleaver was first published.

• In 1973, the first release of American prisoners of war from Vietnam took place.

• In 1983, composer-pianist Eubie Blake, who wrote such songs as "I'm Just Wild About Harry" and "Memories of You," died in New York City, five days after turning 100.

• In 1993, In a crime that shocked Britons, two 10-year-old boys, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables, lured 2-year-old James Bulger from his mother at a shopping mall near Liverpool, England, then beat him to death. (After eight years in a reformatory, Thompson and Venables were released after a parole board found they no longer posed a danger to the public.)

• In 1999, the Senate voted to acquit President Clinton of perjury and obstruction of justice.

• In 2002, Former Enron chairman Kenneth Lay expressed "profound sadness" about the collapse of the energy giant, but refused to testify at a Senate hearing.

In the world

• In 1993, In a crime that shocked Britons, two 10-year-old boys, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables, lured 2-year-old James Bulger from his mother at a shopping mall near Liverpool, England, then beat him to death. (After eight years in a reformatory, Thompson and Venables were released after a parole board found they no longer posed a danger to the public.)

• In 2002, Former Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic went on trial in The Hague, accused of war crimes. Pakistan charged three men in connection with the kidnapping of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Karachi (they and a fourth man were later convicted of Pearl's murder). An Iranian passenger jet crashed, killing all 119 on board.



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