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Thursday, March 8, 2001

Thank You

Obituary

Obituary

Landscaping in Alaska
The earth writhes, exploding with emergent tips, long anticipated spring practices its hide and seek game this year. We're ready for the real thing; daffodils, primroses and violets we see waiting buds and count the days. The soil is alternately softened and thickened again as the temperature hovers around the freezing point, and the feeling of growth is almost audible.

Pet of the Week

Obituary

Obituary

Reception for painting restoration
The restoration of historic paintings at downtown Juneau's Holy Trinity Episcopal Church will kick off with a reception at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, at McPhetres Hall.

Briefly

Pet of the Week

Reception for painting restoration
The restoration of historic paintings at downtown Juneau's Holy Trinity Episcopal Church will kick off with a reception at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, at McPhetres Hall.

Thank You

Weddings

Weddings

Around Town

Around Town

Around Town

Arrivals

Arrivals

Briefly

Landscaping in Alaska
The earth writhes, exploding with emergent tips, long anticipated spring practices its hide and seek game this year. We're ready for the real thing; daffodils, primroses and violets we see waiting buds and count the days. The soil is alternately softened and thickened again as the temperature hovers around the freezing point, and the feeling of growth is almost audible.

Around Town

Natasha Zahn Pristas: Water colorist, block printer

Calendar

Halls of color
Juneau quilter Sally Dwyer has seen her craft come a long way in 17 years. She remembers the dark age of double-knit polyester, back in the mid-1980s.

Halls of color
Juneau quilter Sally Dwyer has seen her craft come a long way in 17 years. She remembers the dark age of double-knit polyester, back in the mid-1980s.

Newbery winner to offer tips on writing
I t seems unlikely that a schoolgirl who hated history would grow up to be a historical novelist.

Newbery winner to offer tips on writing
I t seems unlikely that a schoolgirl who hated history would grow up to be a historical novelist.

Natasha Zahn Pristas: Water colorist, block printer

Calendar

Briefly

Briefly

Briefly

Snowshoers win gold after training in sand
As a racing medium, snow may be overrated. Just ask the Egyptian Snowshoe Team at the 2001 Special Olympics World Winter Games.

Special Olympics skater to race at nationals
ANCHORAGE - Tray Greene hurtles around a speed skating oval like a pebble whirled in a sling.

One-stop landfill expands options
Recycling in Juneau is expanding. It has graduated from a glass crusher operating in a state parking lot one morning a week to a city-funded center that accepts a wider variety of recyclables and is open two full days.

Census data for redistricting on the way
The U.S. Census Bureau tentatively is scheduled to release complete Alaska data next week, beginning the process of redrawing legislative boundaries to reflect shifts in population between 1990 and 2000.

Ex-legislator Hugh Malone dies in Italy
Douglas resident Hugh Malone, a former speaker of the Alaska House of Representatives, has been killed in a boating accident in Italy, according to Attorney General Bruce Botelho.

Special Olympics skater to race at nationals
ANCHORAGE - Tray Greene hurtles around a speed skating oval like a pebble whirled in a sling.

Legislature 2001: Bill alters exit exam
A Republican lawmaker threw a safety net Wednesday to high school juniors expected to fail a mandatory competency test next year.

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

Governor requests cost of his eviction
The Knowles administration has asked for an architectural analysis of what it would cost to move the governor's and lieutenant governor's offices out of the Capitol.

School board names Morse JDHS principal
Deb Morse, confirmed by the Juneau School Board on Tuesday as Juneau-Douglas High School's principal, says she likes challenges. That's just as well, because she's been working 12-hour days as the school's interim principal this year.

School board names Morse JDHS principal
Deb Morse, confirmed by the Juneau School Board on Tuesday as Juneau-Douglas High School's principal, says she likes challenges. That's just as well, because she's been working 12-hour days as the school's interim principal this year.

Halibut farms seek foothold
Halibut farms haven't grown as quickly as predicted, but they are gaining ground and could eventually do to longliners what salmon farms have done to trollers and other gear groups, according to an expert in the field.

Halibut farms seek foothold
Halibut farms haven't grown as quickly as predicted, but they are gaining ground and could eventually do to longliners what salmon farms have done to trollers and other gear groups, according to an expert in the field.

Burmeister chases Iditarod dream
RAINY PASS - One of Aaron Burmeister's earliest memories is being picked up and placed on his father's sled for the ride across the finish line of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Burmeister chases Iditarod dream
RAINY PASS - One of Aaron Burmeister's earliest memories is being picked up and placed on his father's sled for the ride across the finish line of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

Legislative session slower than usual
With this year's legislative session half over, the Legislature has completed work on just three bills - two renaming roads and one re-establishing the state Board of Public Accountancy.

Governor requests cost of his eviction
The Knowles administration has asked for an architectural analysis of what it would cost to move the governor's and lieutenant governor's offices out of the Capitol.

Census data for redistricting on the way
The U.S. Census Bureau tentatively is scheduled to release complete Alaska data next week, beginning the process of redrawing legislative boundaries to reflect shifts in population between 1990 and 2000.

One-stop landfill expands options
Recycling in Juneau is expanding. It has graduated from a glass crusher operating in a state parking lot one morning a week to a city-funded center that accepts a wider variety of recyclables and is open two full days.

Briefly

Ex-legislator Hugh Malone dies in Italy
Douglas resident Hugh Malone, a former speaker of the Alaska House of Representatives, has been killed in a boating accident in Italy, according to Attorney General Bruce Botelho.

Legislature 2001: Bill alters exit exam
A Republican lawmaker threw a safety net Wednesday to high school juniors expected to fail a mandatory competency test next year.

Legislative session slower than usual
With this year's legislative session half over, the Legislature has completed work on just three bills - two renaming roads and one re-establishing the state Board of Public Accountancy.

Snowshoers win gold after training in sand
As a racing medium, snow may be overrated. Just ask the Egyptian Snowshoe Team at the 2001 Special Olympics World Winter Games.

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

The value of seniors
I am writing this letter to remind the government and residents of Juneau of the economic value of senior citizens in this community. Retired persons should be counted in this economy as jobs. Retired persons who settle in Juneau spend their retirement "paychecks" to live as any other worker would spend their paychecks. Most retirement income originates outside of the community, classifying this group as a basic industry.

The value of seniors
I am writing this letter to remind the government and residents of Juneau of the economic value of senior citizens in this community. Retired persons should be counted in this economy as jobs. Retired persons who settle in Juneau spend their retirement "paychecks" to live as any other worker would spend their paychecks. Most retirement income originates outside of the community, classifying this group as a basic industry.

Nothing to lose, everything to gain
Byron Mallot, in a recent Anchorage Daily News article, bluntly condemned acts of violence against Alaska Natives and the failure of state policy makers to look directly into the face of racism in Alaska. It seems most Alaska Natives have patiently trusted that equal distribution of justice and resources would eventually find its way to the Native community. Finally, in the shadow of violence, the sleeping giant of self-determination appears to be waking.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Do we deserve the capital?
Juneau has barely maintained its position as the capital of Alaska. I believe we need to continually ask ourselves this question, do we deserve the honor? Here is an example: When Centennial Hall was built it was an oasis of warmth and hospitality. The beautiful lobby and comfortable orange couches warmed the heart of a tired visitor. It formed a great meeting place for old friends now separated by great distances. That spirit left a feeling that made people want to come back.

The Taliban's other outrage
The following editorial appeared in today's Chicago Tribune: For at least a millennium and a half, the Buddhas of Bamiyan towered over a mountain valley in central Afghanistan. The statues were carved out of sandstone cliffs; the taller one, soaring 175 feet, is the tallest Buddha in the world.

Missile defense system could use a reality check
The following editorial appeared in today's Los Angeles Times: The Bush administration and Congress are being reminded that a highly complex system like the proposed national missile shield can't simply be willed into existence.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Do we deserve the capital?
Juneau has barely maintained its position as the capital of Alaska. I believe we need to continually ask ourselves this question, do we deserve the honor? Here is an example: When Centennial Hall was built it was an oasis of warmth and hospitality. The beautiful lobby and comfortable orange couches warmed the heart of a tired visitor. It formed a great meeting place for old friends now separated by great distances. That spirit left a feeling that made people want to come back.

Missile defense system could use a reality check
The following editorial appeared in today's Los Angeles Times: The Bush administration and Congress are being reminded that a highly complex system like the proposed national missile shield can't simply be willed into existence.

The Taliban's other outrage
The following editorial appeared in today's Chicago Tribune: For at least a millennium and a half, the Buddhas of Bamiyan towered over a mountain valley in central Afghanistan. The statues were carved out of sandstone cliffs; the taller one, soaring 175 feet, is the tallest Buddha in the world.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Nothing to lose, everything to gain
Byron Mallot, in a recent Anchorage Daily News article, bluntly condemned acts of violence against Alaska Natives and the failure of state policy makers to look directly into the face of racism in Alaska. It seems most Alaska Natives have patiently trusted that equal distribution of justice and resources would eventually find its way to the Native community. Finally, in the shadow of violence, the sleeping giant of self-determination appears to be waking.

Local Scoreboard: Region V Standings

Sports Briefs

Fiedler first musher out of Takotna
TAKOTNA, Alaska -- Linwood Fiedler of Willow was the first musher out of this riverside village Wednesday as leaders in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race moved toward the ghost town of Ophir.

Nosko drops out after team hit by speeding snowmachiner
ANCHORAGE -- Willow musher Mike Nosko has dropped out of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race after his dog team was hit by a speeding snowmachiner.

Local Scoreboard: Region V Standings

Local Scoreboard: Alaska State Hoops Polls

Nosko drops out after team hit by speeding snowmachiner
ANCHORAGE -- Willow musher Mike Nosko has dropped out of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race after his dog team was hit by a speeding snowmachiner.

Swingley first into Iditarod's halfway point
IDITAROD -- Defending champion Doug Swingley was the first musher into this namesake Gold Rush ghost town as leaders in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race reached the midpoint of the 1,100-mile event.

Hayward and Metlakatla upset Ketchikan boys
Chevy Hayward scored all of his team-high 17 points in the second half as the Class 3A Metlakatla High School boys basketball team upset the Class 4A Ketchikan Kings last Thursday in Metlakatla.

Sports in Juneau

Sports in Juneau

Sports Briefs

Fiedler first musher out of Takotna
TAKOTNA, Alaska -- Linwood Fiedler of Willow was the first musher out of this riverside village Wednesday as leaders in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race moved toward the ghost town of Ophir.

Sports in Juneau

Hayward and Metlakatla upset Ketchikan boys
Chevy Hayward scored all of his team-high 17 points in the second half as the Class 3A Metlakatla High School boys basketball team upset the Class 4A Ketchikan Kings last Thursday in Metlakatla.

Local Scoreboard: Alaska State Hoops Polls

Swingley first into Iditarod's halfway point
IDITAROD -- Defending champion Doug Swingley was the first musher into this namesake Gold Rush ghost town as leaders in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race reached the midpoint of the 1,100-mile event.

Sports in Juneau

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