This Day in History

Posted: Friday, March 28, 2008

In Alaska, in the Nation and the World

In Alaska

• In 1924, the Revilla Hotel in Ketchikan burned at a $240,000 loss. It was replaced by the Ingersoll Hotel.

• In 1928, Juneau was designated as the Alaska headquarters of the U.S. Bureau of Mines, moving from Anchorage.

• In 1933, former Alaska Gov. Frank Murkowski was born in Seattle.

• In 1959, 3,000 Anchorage residents welcomed the Detroit '59'ers on Easter Sunday, on their way from Detroit to homestead land on the Kenai Peninsula.

In the nation

• In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to censure President Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States.

• In 1898, the Supreme Court ruled in United States v. Wong Kim Ark that a child born in the United States to Chinese immigrants was a U.S. citizen.

• In 1979, America's worst commercial nuclear accident occurred inside the Unit 2 reactor at the Three Mile Island plant near Middletown, Pa.

In the world

• In 1854, during the Crimean War, Britain and France declared war on Russia.

• In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara.

• In 1939, the Spanish Civil War effectively ended as Madrid fell to the forces of Francisco Franco.

• In 1942, during World War II, British naval forces raided the Nazi-occupied French port of St. Nazaire in Operation Chariot.



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