This Day in History

Posted: Thursday, April 07, 2005

In Alaska

• In 1911, the sailing ship Jabez Howes of Columbia River Packers was wrecked at Chignik.

• In 1949, the National Park Service announced a proposal to spend $3.5 million to develop facilities at Bartlett Cove, at the mouth of Glacier Bay.

• In 1958, an earthquake, centered about 150 miles north of Fairbanks, measured up to 8.5 on the Richter scale. There was no reported damage.

• In 1979, the Alaska Supreme Court ruled that a homestead filed in 1929 along the Gastineau Channel did not include 117 acres of new land created by isostatic rebound in the 50 years since filing.

In the nation

• In 1862, Union forces led by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee.

• In 1927, an audience in New York saw an image of Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover in the first successful long-distance demonstration of television.

• In 1966, the United States recovered a hydrogen bomb it had lost off the coast of Spain.

• In 1969, the Supreme Court unanimously struck down laws prohibiting private possession of obscene material.

• In 1995, President Clinton threatened to veto a lengthy list of bills passed by the Republican-controlled House if they were not modified in the Senate. In a prime-time television address, House Speaker Newt Gingrich declared the GOP "Contract with America" was only a beginning.

• In 2000, Attorney General Janet Reno met in Washington with the father of Elian Gonzalez; Reno later told reporters that officials would arrange for Juan Miguel Gonzalez to reclaim his son, but she gave Elian's Miami relatives one more chance to drop their resistance and join in a peaceful transfer.

In the world

• In 1939, Italy invaded Albania. (Less than a week later, Italy annexed Albania.)

• In 1945, during World War II, American planes intercepted a Japanese fleet that was headed for Okinawa on a suicide mission.

• In 1948, the World Health Organization was founded.

• In 1953, the U.N. General Assembly elected Dag Hammarskjold of Sweden to be secretary-general.

• In 1994, civil war erupted in Rwanda, a day after a mysterious plane crash claimed the lives of the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi. In the months that followed, hundreds of thousands of minority Tutsis and Hutu intellectuals were slaughtered.

• In 2004, Mounir el Motassadeq, the only Sept. 11 suspect ever convicted, was freed after a Hamburg, Germany court, ruled that the evidence was too weak to hold him pending a retrial.



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