This Day in History

Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2005

In Alaska

• In 1938, the steamer Tongass, of the Alaska Transportation Company, arrived in Juneau on her first Alaska voyage.

• In 1959, U.S. Senator E.L. (Bob) Bartlett (D-Alaska) called for a full-scale investigation of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's plans to take over 1,600 acres of land for a nuclear experiment.

• In 1969, the Alaska State Senate passed an amendment to the State Constitution allowing 18-year olds to vote.

• In 1969, a team of scientists from the University of Alaska's Geophysical Institute began their investigation of auroral radio noises, under contract with the U.S. Army.

In the nation

• In 1775, the first American society for the abolition of slavery was organized by Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Rush.

• In 1828, the first edition of Noah Webster's "American Dictionary of the English Language" was published.

• In 1865, President Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while attending the comedy "Our American Cousin" at Ford's Theater in Washington. (Lincoln died the following morning.)

• In 1902, James Cash Penney opened his first store, called "The Golden Rule," in Kemmerer, Wyo.

• In 1939, the John Steinbeck novel "The Grapes of Wrath" was first published.

• In 1981, the first test flight of America's first operational space shuttle, the Columbia, ended successfully with a landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.



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