This Day in History

Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2007

In Alaska, in the Nation and the World

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In Alaska

• In 1778, Capt. James Cook discovered Turnagain Arm while looking for the Northwest Passage.

• In 1899, the Harriman scientific expedition left Seattle for Alaska.

In the nation

• In 1854, the territories of Nebraska and Kansas were established.

• In 1883, 12 people were trampled to death when a rumor that the recently opened Brooklyn Bridge was in imminent danger of collapsing triggered a stampede.

• In 1911, Indianapolis saw its first long-distance auto race; Ray Harroun was the winner.

• In 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated by President Harding, Chief Justice William Howard Taft and Robert Todd Lincoln.

• In 1937, 10 people were killed when police fired on steelworkers demonstrating near the Republic Steel plant in Chicago.

• In 1943, American forces secured the Aleutian island of Attu from the Japanese during World War II.

• In 1958, unidentified American soldiers killed in World War II and the Korean conflict were buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

• In 1971, the American space probe Mariner 9 blasted off from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on a journey to Mars.

• In 1986, 21 elderly passengers were killed when a tour bus went out of control on a mountain road and plunged into the Walker River near the California-Nevada border.

• In 1997, child molester Jesse K. Timmendequas was convicted in Trenton, N.J., of raping and strangling a 7-year-old neighbor, Megan Kanka, whose 1994 murder inspired "Megan's Law," requiring that communities be notified when sex offenders move in. (Timmendequas was later sentenced to death; he remains on death row.)

• In 2002, a solemn, wordless ceremony marked the end of the agonizing cleanup at ground zero in New York, 8½ months after Sept. 11. Attorney General John Ashcroft issued new terror-fighting guidelines allowing FBI agents to visit Internet sites, libraries, churches and political organizations as part of an effort to pre-empt terrorist strikes. Nine climbers fell into a crevasse near the summit of Oregon's Mount Hood; three died.

• In 2006, U.S. Air Force Gen. Michael Hayden was sworn in as CIA director. President Bush tapped Goldman Sachs chief Henry Paulson to be Treasury secretary.



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