Tuesday, June 26, 2001

Slow season for Juneau builders and remodelers
The 2001 building season is turning out to be slower than usual for some local contractors.

In the Tank

Business Profile

Business Profile

New road toll bites into business in Whittier
Brenda Tolman, owner of Log Cabin Gifts in Whittier, knows business has been down since the state started charging a toll to drive through the tunnel to Whittier. Her coin-operated reindeer food dispenser tells her so.

In the Tank

Slow season for Juneau builders and remodelers
The 2001 building season is turning out to be slower than usual for some local contractors.

New road toll bites into business in Whittier
Brenda Tolman, owner of Log Cabin Gifts in Whittier, knows business has been down since the state started charging a toll to drive through the tunnel to Whittier. Her coin-operated reindeer food dispenser tells her so.

Around Town

Obituary

Around Town

Obituary

Around Town

Around Town

Obituary

Obituary

Briefly

City to back off shooting urban bears
In a policy shift, the city of Juneau will only kill bears in the event of an immediate threat to people.

Crews fight to keep fires away from Parks Highway
FAIRBANKS - Two giant wildfires continued to burn on the Tanana Flats as crews worked to contain them and winds shifted to drive the flames eastward and away from the Parks Highway.

Pickups return for recyclables
Juneau offices that have been stockpiling paper for recycling will see relief starting next week.

Court OKs charges for World Plus scam
ANCHORAGE - The Alaska Court of Appeals has decided a Fairbanks woman convicted in federal court of running a scheme that bilked investors out of millions of dollars can be tried on state charges.

Court OKs charges for World Plus scam
ANCHORAGE - The Alaska Court of Appeals has decided a Fairbanks woman convicted in federal court of running a scheme that bilked investors out of millions of dollars can be tried on state charges.

North Pole fire chief's car becomes Hot Wheels
NORTH POLE - In a city more closely aligned with Santa's sleigh than hot rods, a newly issued car is turning heads. The Mattel toy company has produced a Hot Wheels fire chief's car with North Pole markings.

Tanana wildfires sweep across thousands of acres
ANCHORAGE - Two fires south of Fairbanks covered about 80,000 acres Sunday as high temperatures and light winds kept the fires moving to the southwest.

City OKs plans for commercial use of trails
Juneau's Assembly endorsed a list of recommendations about commercial use of local trails at a meeting Monday.

TV show looks at Begich crash
Tonight, the History Channel re-examines one of the state's greatest unsolved mysteries in "Alaska's Bermuda Triangle."

Gwich'in, environmentalists gather to continue ANWR fight
ARCTIC VILLAGE - Gwich'in Athabascan Indians and their environmentalist allies gathered over the weekend for panel discussions on protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil development.

Blaze guts valley home
A Mendenhall Valley home was gutted by fire Monday afternoon, causing up to $150,000 damage.

North Pole fire chief's car becomes Hot Wheels
NORTH POLE - In a city more closely aligned with Santa's sleigh than hot rods, a newly issued car is turning heads. The Mattel toy company has produced a Hot Wheels fire chief's car with North Pole markings.

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

City to back off shooting urban bears
In a policy shift, the city of Juneau will only kill bears in the event of an immediate threat to people.

Briefly

Gold Rush-era cache found near Delta Junction
FAIRBANKS - Two tins of LaMont's Improved Crystallized Egg bearing testimonials from Mrs. General Custer. Two dog collars. A cleaning kit for a .30-caliber rifle tucked inside a rusty baking soda can touting the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. A hand-forged hook. A newspaper clipping that expounds on the ornamental domes on the new Brooklyn Bridge added in 1896. A small plate-glass mirror.

Kenai processors short on staff for slime line
KENAI - With the commercial fishing season beginning in Cook Inlet, Kenai Peninsula processors are worried they won't be able to handle the flow of fish because of a shortage of workers.

Kenai processors short on staff for slime line
KENAI - With the commercial fishing season beginning in Cook Inlet, Kenai Peninsula processors are worried they won't be able to handle the flow of fish because of a shortage of workers.

Knowles signs bill to cover costs of cancer treatment
Juneau resident Kate Coleman is still paying off doctors for treatment of breast cancer diagnosed last year, but a bill signed today by Gov. Tony Knowles could spare many women the financial hardship.

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

Briefly

Wildlife detective finds brown bears are top moose killer
McGRATH - Like a detective working a crime scene, state Fish and Game biologist Toby Boudreau knelt on the forest floor searching for hairs stuck to wild rose bushes. The victim, a mostly eaten moose calf, lay nearby.

21 bills become state law
Gov. Tony Knowles signed 21 bills into law Monday, including a measure repealing term-limit pledge laws and a bill requiring convicted burglars to submit to DNA testing.

Tanana wildfires sweep across thousands of acres
ANCHORAGE - Two fires south of Fairbanks covered about 80,000 acres Sunday as high temperatures and light winds kept the fires moving to the southwest.

City OKs plans for commercial use of trails
Juneau's Assembly endorsed a list of recommendations about commercial use of local trails at a meeting Monday.

Pickups return for recyclables
Juneau offices that have been stockpiling paper for recycling will see relief starting next week.

TV show looks at Begich crash
Tonight, the History Channel re-examines one of the state's greatest unsolved mysteries in "Alaska's Bermuda Triangle."

Knowles signs bill to cover costs of cancer treatment
Juneau resident Kate Coleman is still paying off doctors for treatment of breast cancer diagnosed last year, but a bill signed today by Gov. Tony Knowles could spare many women the financial hardship.

Blaze guts valley home
A Mendenhall Valley home was gutted by fire Monday afternoon, causing up to $150,000 damage.

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

Police and Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported...

Wildlife detective finds brown bears are top moose killer
McGRATH - Like a detective working a crime scene, state Fish and Game biologist Toby Boudreau knelt on the forest floor searching for hairs stuck to wild rose bushes. The victim, a mostly eaten moose calf, lay nearby.

21 bills become state law
Gov. Tony Knowles signed 21 bills into law Monday, including a measure repealing term-limit pledge laws and a bill requiring convicted burglars to submit to DNA testing.

Briefly

Gold Rush-era cache found near Delta Junction
FAIRBANKS - Two tins of LaMont's Improved Crystallized Egg bearing testimonials from Mrs. General Custer. Two dog collars. A cleaning kit for a .30-caliber rifle tucked inside a rusty baking soda can touting the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. A hand-forged hook. A newspaper clipping that expounds on the ornamental domes on the new Brooklyn Bridge added in 1896. A small plate-glass mirror.

Crews fight to keep fires away from Parks Highway
FAIRBANKS - Two giant wildfires continued to burn on the Tanana Flats as crews worked to contain them and winds shifted to drive the flames eastward and away from the Parks Highway.

Gwich'in, environmentalists gather to continue ANWR fight
ARCTIC VILLAGE - Gwich'in Athabascan Indians and their environmentalist allies gathered over the weekend for panel discussions on protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil development.

Respect the process
In a recent letter, Mark Wheeler and Jim Powell, City and Borough of Juneau areawide assembly members, stated their support of Juneau teachers and urged the board of education to grant teachers a raise with the additional $650,000 the district is to receive from the state.

Wary of 'mitigation'
In 1960 my family moved to the airport area. I used to have fun playing on the floating muskeg ponds, catching toads and picking nagoonberries. In the winter we would iceskate on the airport ponds. The toads, berries and the ponds have disappeared and the skating is not longer allowed, however, we still have the dike trail. Every year I walk the trail close to 300 times. I start my day, rain, snow or shine, walking the trail, watching the seasons change, and seeing the wildlife. I've seen deer, otters, snowy owl and other owls, a variety of hawks, ptarmigan, cranes, an egret and even a sea eagle in addition to the more common waterfowl and birds. This trail provides me an important daily pleasure in my life.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Time for redistricting reform
The following editorial appeared in Sunday's Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Incumbents are howling about the effects of the new redistricting schemes on their home seats. Their distress is understandable; most members of the current Legislature face the unenviable prospect of running against fellow incumbents or retiring.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Getting SE on track
A story in Wednesday's Empire, "SE Residents Leaving Towns," failed to analyze several factors contributing to the Southeast Alaska's demographic shift. It's true places like Hobart Bay, Labouchere Bay and Long Island have shrunk dramatically or have completely emptied, but to tie their demise to timber mill shutdowns is inaccurate. The fact is Hobart Bay, Labouchere Bay, Dora Bay, Port Alice and Long Island are gone because most of the trees are gone. Those who worked and lived at these camps cut their way out of a job.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Wary of 'mitigation'
In 1960 my family moved to the airport area. I used to have fun playing on the floating muskeg ponds, catching toads and picking nagoonberries. In the winter we would iceskate on the airport ponds. The toads, berries and the ponds have disappeared and the skating is not longer allowed, however, we still have the dike trail. Every year I walk the trail close to 300 times. I start my day, rain, snow or shine, walking the trail, watching the seasons change, and seeing the wildlife. I've seen deer, otters, snowy owl and other owls, a variety of hawks, ptarmigan, cranes, an egret and even a sea eagle in addition to the more common waterfowl and birds. This trail provides me an important daily pleasure in my life.

Abused men: dis-information or real problem?
After reading Bryan Clark's My Turn rebuttal (attack) of June 19, I promptly licked my wounds and ran for my dictionary to look up all of those big words that Mr. Clark used. I thought, of course, that since he used all of those wonderful words that he must certainly have been right and that I must have been all wet with my interpretation of the study and the problems it alludes to.

Appalled by cartoon
I was appalled at the cartoon appearing on the Opinion/Viewpoint page of Sunday's Juneau Empire. Rarely has the Empire displayed such poor editorial judgment.

Time for redistricting reform
The following editorial appeared in Sunday's Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Incumbents are howling about the effects of the new redistricting schemes on their home seats. Their distress is understandable; most members of the current Legislature face the unenviable prospect of running against fellow incumbents or retiring.

Abused men: dis-information or real problem?
After reading Bryan Clark's My Turn rebuttal (attack) of June 19, I promptly licked my wounds and ran for my dictionary to look up all of those big words that Mr. Clark used. I thought, of course, that since he used all of those wonderful words that he must certainly have been right and that I must have been all wet with my interpretation of the study and the problems it alludes to.

Sparing garbage bears
As Juneau bear expert and state biologist Neil Barten explains, in most cases a bear in someone's garbage is not a public safety issue.

Can a prevaricating historian be trusted?
"The first law for the historian is that he shall never dare utter an untruth," the great Roman orator and writer Cicero said.

Kudos for garbage bear resolution
My hat's off to the city for finally being courageous enough to put the responsibility for the garbage bear problem where it belongs, on the makers of the garbage. It is appalling that we would kill a mother bear and her cub to make up for bad choices on the part of humans. Dogs should not be left out where they are at risk. Garbage should not be left out to draw the bears in. Finally the law is getting some teeth in this matter, and I am thrilled.

Word of Mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute. We reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. Callers must leave their name and a number at which they can be contacted (usually between 8 a.m. and noon). Only comments accompanied by a name will be published and only after the caller's identity is verified. Callers' names will appear in print. Call 586-4636 and press 8255 to leave a message.

Assembly could do more for teachers
A letter appeared in last Thursday's paper from Assembly members Marc Wheeler and Jim Powell, urging the School Board to give Juneau teachers a raise. As a former School Board member, I certainly agree that our local teachers are of the highest quality and deserve a pay raise, if this can be done without negatively impacting the quality of education provided to our children. However, our assemblymen base their argument on several erroneous and misleading facts, and neglect to include other relevant facts. I would like to clear the record.

Sparing garbage bears
As Juneau bear expert and state biologist Neil Barten explains, in most cases a bear in someone's garbage is not a public safety issue.

Can a prevaricating historian be trusted?
"The first law for the historian is that he shall never dare utter an untruth," the great Roman orator and writer Cicero said.

Respect the process
In a recent letter, Mark Wheeler and Jim Powell, City and Borough of Juneau areawide assembly members, stated their support of Juneau teachers and urged the board of education to grant teachers a raise with the additional $650,000 the district is to receive from the state.

Appalled by cartoon
I was appalled at the cartoon appearing on the Opinion/Viewpoint page of Sunday's Juneau Empire. Rarely has the Empire displayed such poor editorial judgment.

Kudos for garbage bear resolution
My hat's off to the city for finally being courageous enough to put the responsibility for the garbage bear problem where it belongs, on the makers of the garbage. It is appalling that we would kill a mother bear and her cub to make up for bad choices on the part of humans. Dogs should not be left out where they are at risk. Garbage should not be left out to draw the bears in. Finally the law is getting some teeth in this matter, and I am thrilled.

Getting SE on track
A story in Wednesday's Empire, "SE Residents Leaving Towns," failed to analyze several factors contributing to the Southeast Alaska's demographic shift. It's true places like Hobart Bay, Labouchere Bay and Long Island have shrunk dramatically or have completely emptied, but to tie their demise to timber mill shutdowns is inaccurate. The fact is Hobart Bay, Labouchere Bay, Dora Bay, Port Alice and Long Island are gone because most of the trees are gone. Those who worked and lived at these camps cut their way out of a job.

Is the missile defense a 'rush to failure?'
At a Washington, D.C., cocktail party in March filled with Pentagon officials and defense contractors, one conversation turned to scuttlebutt that the Bush administration might try to deploy a missile defense system by 2004. That would be at least two years faster than the already-rushed Bill Clinton plan, which the brass and military testers agreed was "high risk."

Assembly could do more for teachers
A letter appeared in last Thursday's paper from Assembly members Marc Wheeler and Jim Powell, urging the School Board to give Juneau teachers a raise. As a former School Board member, I certainly agree that our local teachers are of the highest quality and deserve a pay raise, if this can be done without negatively impacting the quality of education provided to our children. However, our assemblymen base their argument on several erroneous and misleading facts, and neglect to include other relevant facts. I would like to clear the record.

Is the missile defense a 'rush to failure?'
At a Washington, D.C., cocktail party in March filled with Pentagon officials and defense contractors, one conversation turned to scuttlebutt that the Bush administration might try to deploy a missile defense system by 2004. That would be at least two years faster than the already-rushed Bill Clinton plan, which the brass and military testers agreed was "high risk."

Quinto leads Excalibur to Rainball title
Randy Quinto was named the Men's Division I tournament MVP after leading Excalibur to 23-14 victory over Taku Oil in Sunday's division championship game of the Juneau Softball Association/Travelodge 2001 Rainball Invitational Softball Tournament at Dimond Park.

Juneau pitchers impressive in season debuts
Two minor league pitchers from Juneau were impressive in their season debuts Sunday in the New York-Penn League, a short-season Class A minor league.

Juneau soccer teams sweep Solstice Invite
Juneau youth soccer teams claimed the titles in all three divisions of the Solstice Invitational Soccer Tournament, which ended Sunday at Adair-Kennedy Memorial Park. The three-day tournament brought together 190 middle-school age soccer players from Ketchikan, Juneau and Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.

Sports in Juneau

Sports in Juneau

Juneau soccer teams sweep Solstice Invite
Juneau youth soccer teams claimed the titles in all three divisions of the Solstice Invitational Soccer Tournament, which ended Sunday at Adair-Kennedy Memorial Park. The three-day tournament brought together 190 middle-school age soccer players from Ketchikan, Juneau and Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.

Juneau pitchers impressive in season debuts
Two minor league pitchers from Juneau were impressive in their season debuts Sunday in the New York-Penn League, a short-season Class A minor league.

Sports in Juneau

Quinto leads Excalibur to Rainball title
Randy Quinto was named the Men's Division I tournament MVP after leading Excalibur to 23-14 victory over Taku Oil in Sunday's division championship game of the Juneau Softball Association/Travelodge 2001 Rainball Invitational Softball Tournament at Dimond Park.

Sports in Juneau

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