Wednesday, August 27, 2003

Totally dishonored
Thank you to the city of Juneau for allowing the Greenpeace ship tie up at the city dock on Sunday. Our city showed its open friendly attitude that makes me proud to be a citizen.

Aerial video
I have been contracted to produce a 10-minute public information video about Phase I of the second crossing EIS. The helicopter flight necessary to get aerial video may cause some concern, so I was asked by Bob Engelbrecht of Northstar Trekking to publicly announce the nature of this project. I alerted the city manager. Engelbrecht has contacted the FAA and the flight tower. For more information, please contact me at 175 S. Franklin, 586-1166, fax 586-1811.

Height of arrogance
In July, the Empire reported that Planned Parenthood had opened a Juneau office. The group's director said its goal was to "visit middle school and high school classes in Juneau to present age-appropriate and medically accurate information on sexual development, healthy relationships, methods of birth control, sexually transmitted infections and teaching strategies for sexual health curricula."

Ashamed, embarrassed
I was so pleased to be a part of the 100-plus people who gathered on the dock Sunday evening in anticipation of visiting the Esperanza. We were excited but we also were ashamed and embarrassed that our city had been and was treating these people so shabbily. They had to struggle to find water, fuel and, of course, were denied dock space. They were arrogantly dismissed as a non-entity in the Juneau Empire.

Keep tabs on politicians
Rep. Croft said it right! All of you who lost your longevity bonus, all the kids who have less spent on them for the classroom, all the special needs kids waiting for months or years on a list trying to get diagnosis or care, all the prevention programs in the schools that have been cut from lack of funding, etc. Now you see where the money went.

A bridge too narrow
I am somewhat concerned with the Assembly's plans to make a third traffic lane on the Douglas Bridge. The bridge, though wider than the old Douglas Bridge, is still not very wide to begin with, and to try and squeeze a third lane in, at the expense of the bikers, in my opinion, does not make sense.

Photo: Going up
Members of the Tongass Tribe help lift and pull carver Israel Shotridge's Sun Raven Totem Pole into place Saturday in Ketchikan. The pole now stands in front of the University of Alaska Southeast Ketchikan campus' Robertson Building. This is the third Sun Raven Totem Pole raised in the area.

Police & Fire
Reports by Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers.

Repaired tour boat returning to service
The Orca Enterprises whale-watching fleet could be back in full force today after a carbon-monoxide problem on one of its boats sent eight people to Bartlett Regional Hospital on Sunday for treatment. Capital City Fire and Rescue transported eight people from the Auke Bay Harbor on Sunday. Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Daniel Buchsbaum, an investigator for the Marine Safety Office, said the passengers were treated and released.

Around Town
Around Town is a listing of local nonprofit events.

Photo: Checking the tide
Michael Orelove, far left, watches Monday as Juneau Docks and Harbors employees Doug Unruh, center, and Larry McGhee mount a tide-indicator arrow on top of the Marine Park ramp. The Juneau Community Tide Gauge will point to the tide marker, letting observers know how high or low the tide is. The arrow was too wide and was promptly removed to be trimmed so it will fit when it is installed in the near future.

Cohen will run for Board again
Juneau School Board President Chuck Cohen said Tuesday he will run for re-election. So far, Alan Schorr, an incumbent, and Dave Williams have been certified by the city to run for the School Board. Williams, who was certified Tuesday, is an administrator with the state Department of Health and Social Services who has put three children through the Juneau public schools.

Photo: Tatoosh sighted
The Tatoosh, a 300-foot yacht, was tied up Tuesday at the Southeast Alaska Lighterage barge near the state ferry terminal. The Power & Motoryacht Web site described the vessel in 2002 as the world's 11th largest yacht. The New York Times reported in September 2001 that the yacht had been built by telecommunications mogul Craig McCaw, who sold it to Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen for $100 million. The yacht carried two helicopters, a 40-foot speedboat and a sailboat and has a swimming pool, the Times said.

Photo: On the waterfront
Passengers walk to their floatplanes Monday at the Wings of Alaska dock in front of Merchants Wharf. The roughly 10,000 cruise ship visitors expected in Juneau Monday experienced sunny skies and temperatures in the 60s.

Defendant in Kmart heist accused of beating man
Awaiting trial next month on charges he staged a blackout and stole nearly $100,000 from Kmart, the store's former security chief has been sued by a customer who claims he was beaten outside the now-closed retail outlet.

New park becomes outdoor lab
No construction was done on the Dzantik'i Heeni Middle School building this summer. But when students return to the school Wednesday, they'll find a new laboratory to help them study wetland ecosystems. Dzantik'i Heeni teachers and students worked this summer with the nonprofit organization Trail Mix, city engineers and the U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife to turn what once was a gravel pit behind the Juneau Police Department station in Lemon Creek into an outdoor laboratory for students.

Cigarette tax, school repairs make ballot
Voters will choose whether to double city taxes on tobacco and allocate more money for school repairs in the next city election, the Juneau Assembly decided Monday night. The seven Assembly members at the meeting voted unanimously to place a measure on the Oct. 7 city ballot increasing the tax on cigarettes to 30 cents per pack. If passed by voters, the measure also would double the existing 6 percent excise tax on cigars, chewing tobacco and other tobacco products.

Filling an important niche
Being without a permanent shelter does not mean a person should go without basic health care, according to the staff of a new downtown medical and dental clinic that opened Monday to treat Juneau's homeless population.

Horse stable? Not in these backyards
Juneau planning commissioners said they support the idea of a horse-riding business, but they unanimously rejected a proposal Tuesday to stable 40 horses on Mendenhall Loop Road beginning next spring.

Police & Fire
Reports by Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers.

Corrections
Two corrections.

AroundTown
Around Town is a listing of local nonprofit events.

Eckholm, Airhart wed in Montana
Kristin Eckholm of Juneau and Travis Airhart of Missoula, Mont., were married in a ceremony on June 14 at the Missoula Children's Theatre in Missoula.

Photos: No fish story
Above, Jarod Winnen, left, high-fives his brother Jesse after reeling in a 33.2-pound king salmon Saturday afternoon between Shelter and Admiralty islands during the 57th Annual Golden North Salmon Derby. Jarod, a 28-year-old structural engineer in Sherwood, Ore., who was born and raised in Juneau, placed second in the Derby, two pounds behind Vickie Perry's 35.2-pound king. Jarod's other brother, Schyler, is at far right. At right, Jesse Winnen, Peter Metcalfe, Jarod Winnen and Schyler Winnen pose with Jarod's prize king.

Thank you
... to the Hangar on the Wharf

Pets of the week
Kit-Kat and Doc need a home.

NeighborsDigest
Meetings, announcements, applications and awards.

Saceda, Morrissette to marry
Rachelle Saceda of Juneau and Tracy Morrissette of Hood River, Ore., will be married at 2 p.m. on Oct. 11, at Queen of Peace Catholic Church in Salem, Ore. A reception will follow at 5 p.m. at the Cascade Hall on the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem.

Leota O'Keefe
Longtime Juneau resident Leota Elizabeth O'Keefe, 88, died Aug. 4, 2003, from natural causes.

Eleanor Durling
Juneau resident Eleanor "Peggy" Jean Durling, 66, died Aug. 23, 2003, in Juneau after a battle with cancer.

My Turn: The nature of the forest
As one who grew up and worked in remote logging camp locations, I would like to offer the public some facts contrary to Greenpeace's claims that the Tongass National Forest has been devastated. My father logged in Thomas, Big and Little Saltery, Crab, Kadashan, Corner, Freshwater, Saook and Saginaw Bays. His company also logged Mendenhall Valley and Lemon Creek Valley, and built logging roads on Kruzof and Catherine islands. In Kadashan Bay (late 1950s), our logging camp fed flapjacks to a herd of 28 starving deer until my grandfather, A. W. Boddy (who was head of the Alaska Sportsmen's Association) was notified, and the association helped us by sending out bags of oats for the herd.

My Turn: Limiting our choices
Our governor demonstrates his definition of democracy in his approach to Alaska politics by first eliminating the public voice of the people in how the Tongass National Forest will be designated, so that we will not get in his way - a fine example of leadership in a democratic country like America, and the great state of Alaska.

My Turn: How to alienate passengers
Alaska Airlines announced on July 28 a change in its baggage weight policy, which, according to the company, is intended to reduce workplace injuries. Beginning Oct. 1, passengers with bags weighing 51 to 70 pounds will be charged a $25 excess baggage fee, while those with bags weighing 71 to 100 pounds will be charged a $50 fee. Items weighing in excess of 100 pounds cannot be carried as baggage. This policy is a big red herring designed to get the airline's hands deeper into passengers' pockets.

From your pocket to Exxon's
This year, the Alaska government transferred $70 million from the people of the state to large multinational corporations. Did you miss it? Most Alaskans did. As in any good shell game, the trick is to distract the eye, in this case the public eye, from what is really happening. The distraction this year was that perennial bogeyman, the fiscal gap. Let's play the tape of this legislative session back on super slow-motion to see how we lost our money.

Gibb makes first swim at Universiade
While he didn't win a medal, Petersburg High graduate Derek Gibb saw some unexpected action during the World University Games, or Universiade, in Daegu, South Korea. Gibb, who will be a senior for defending NCAA champion Auburn University, was a member of the U.S. men's 4x100-meter freestyle relay team in Monday's swimming events at the Duryu Swimming Pool.

Nate Strong takes his game south, way south
Nate Strong's life has gone in several directions since he led Huna ANB in its loss to the Haines Merchants in the Classic B Bracket title game of the Gold Medal basketball tournament in March.

Bears stay at No. 2
Maybe it's a good thing the Juneau-Douglas High School football team didn't move up a spot this week in the Anchorage Daily News-Alaska State Football Coaches Poll released Monday. Juneau remained second in the poll, as the West Anchorage Eagles leapfrogged over the Crimson Bears to take the No. 1 spot in voting among the state's large-school coaches.

Sports in Juneau
Sports in Juneau is a service provided by the Juneau Empire to provide information on upcoming sports and outdoors events in Juneau.

Sports in Juneau
Sports in Juneau is a service provided by the Juneau Empire to provide information on upcoming sports and outdoors events in Juneau.

Scientists enlist elders in Beluga research
Federal researchers working with Tlingit elders have concluded that beluga whales spotted near Yakutat are likely permanent residents - 600 miles from the nearest confirmed population. Elders and other old-timers told researchers the whales are seen in the area more regularly than has been documented in scientific journals.

AlaskaDigest
Headlines from around the state.

This Day in History
In Alaska; In the nation.

Young pushes to exclude airports from privatization
A bill seeking to block privatization of two air traffic control towers in Alaska has given the National Air Traffic Controllers Association ammunition in its campaign to have the bill rewritten. The bill would allow continued privatization nationally, but Rep. Don Young, an Alaska Republican, secured language to exempt the Juneau airport and another at Merrill Field in Anchorage.

Three chains take stand for roadless rule
Building companies KB Home and Hayward Lumber, as well as office supply chain Staples Inc. - all major consumers of wood products - have lined up with environmental groups trying to protect Alaska forests. The three companies have sent letters to the U.S. Forest Service opposing a proposal that would exempt Alaska's Tongass and Chugach national forests from a nationwide prohibition against road building in national forests.

This Day in History
In Alaska; In the nation; In the world.

Haines pipeline area to be tested for Agent Orange
The Army Corps of Engineers plans to test for the carcinogen dioxin next month along a pipeline corridor that once carried fuel from Haines to Fairbanks. The chemical is a byproduct of herbicides found in the defoliant known as Agent Orange.

UFA petitioning for aid for salmon harvesters
Alaska salmon fishermen who can prove they have suffered economic loss due to farmed salmon imports may be able to apply for as much as $10,000 in federal aid this year.

Funding threatens fish commission
The Pacific Salmon Commission, which manages fishing of endangered salmon in the United States and Canada, is running out of money and could close by the end of the year. The commission, which is funded equally by the two countries under a 1985 treaty, brokered a major agreement in 1999 that sharply reduced the catch of Pacific Northwest salmon off the coast of Canada. Salmon runs in the Northwest have reached record levels in recent years, in part because of the agreement.

AlaskaDigest
Headlines from around the state.

Haines featured travel destination in NY Times
When Michelle Glass, tourism director for the Haines Borough, came to work Monday, one of the first e-mails she sent was to a public relations firm she sometimes works with in Anchorage. "I sent them an e-mail asking how much we would have had to pay for media coverage like that," said Glass.

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