This Day in History

Posted: Wednesday, August 29, 2007

In Alaska

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• In 1904, telegraph service between Seattle and Sitka was officially dedicated.

• In 1931, Joe Crosson flew over the summit of Mount McKinley without oxygen.

• In 1977, the Chugach Electric Association applied for a permanent 25 percent rate increase, the second such increase in less than two years.

In the nation

• In 1957, the Senate gave final congressional approval to a Civil Rights Act after South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond (then a Democrat) ended a filibuster that had lasted 24 hours.

• In 1966, the Beatles concluded their fourth American tour with their last public concert, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

• In 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast near Buras, La.; the resulting floods devastated the city of New Orleans. More than 1,800 people in the region died.

• In 2002, a judge in Norwalk, Conn., sentenced Michael Skakel to 20 years to life in prison for bludgeoning his teenage neighbor, Martha Moxley, with a golf club in 1975 after hearing the Kennedy cousin tearfully proclaim his innocence.

• In 2006, President George Bush visited New Orleans one year after Hurricane Katrina devastated the region to offer comfort and hope to residents. Tropical Storm Ernesto's leading edge drenched Miami and the rest of southern Florida.

In the world

• In 1533, the last Incan King of Peru, Atahualpa, was murdered on orders of Spanish conqueror Francisco Pizarro.

• In 1943, responding to a clampdown by Nazi occupiers, Denmark managed to scuttle most of its naval ships.

• In 1944, 15,000 American troops marched down the Champs Elysees in Paris as the French capital continued to celebrate its liberation from the Nazis.

• In 1965, Gemini 5, carrying astronauts Gordon Cooper and Charles ("Pete") Conrad, splashed down in the Atlantic after eight days in space.

• In 1997, hooded men killed more than 300 people in an Algerian farm village in the worst carnage since an Islamic insurgency began. Japan's Supreme Court ruled that the country's Education Ministry broke the law by removing mention of a Japanese World War II atrocity from historian Saburo Ienaga's high school textbook.



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