Wednesday, August 30, 2000

Around the clock

Chums suffer ferry fallout
When a June 6 fire sidelined the state ferry Columbia for the summer, many of Southeast's fish processors felt the heat.

Around the clock

Chums suffer ferry fallout
When a June 6 fire sidelined the state ferry Columbia for the summer, many of Southeast's fish processors felt the heat.

Cuban diplomat denied visa
WASHINGTON - The Clinton administration has denied a visa to the president of Cuba's National Assembly, preventing him from attending an international conference of parliamentarians in New York, two U.S. officials said Tuesday.

Cuban diplomat denied visa
WASHINGTON - The Clinton administration has denied a visa to the president of Cuba's National Assembly, preventing him from attending an international conference of parliamentarians in New York, two U.S. officials said Tuesday.

Pet of the week

Thank you

Pet of the week

safety first
By PATRICIA MATTISON

Obituary
KRISTA HULSE

Thank you

Obituary
CLARENCE "PETE" PETERSON

briefly

safety first
By PATRICIA MATTISON

Obituary
CLARENCE "PETE" PETERSON

AROUND TOWN

Landscape alaska
It may seem premature, even cowardly, to begin talking about planting fall bulbs while late summer flowers have still to open, but here we are and the time is now, so let's go on. Bulbs are Southeast Alaska's crowning glory; nowhere else have I ever seen the stunning colors last so long, or be greeted with such joy.

AROUND TOWN

Obituary
KRISTA HULSE

Landscape alaska
It may seem premature, even cowardly, to begin talking about planting fall bulbs while late summer flowers have still to open, but here we are and the time is now, so let's go on. Bulbs are Southeast Alaska's crowning glory; nowhere else have I ever seen the stunning colors last so long, or be greeted with such joy.

AROUND TOWN
Today

Awards, honors and graduates
Rebecca Blasco of Juneau has been named to the dean's list at Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., for the spring semester.

Awards, honors and graduates
Rebecca Blasco of Juneau has been named to the dean's list at Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., for the spring semester.

briefly

AROUND TOWN
Today

Bank funds UAS institute
First National Bank of Anchorage has given $96,000 to the University of Alaska Southeast to fund the first three years of a summer Student Leadership Institute.

POLICE AND FIRE
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported:

Alaska farms may lose organic label
Farmers in Alaska who began officially certifying their produce as organic last year are concerned they may lose that label if standards being considered by the federal government are approved.

State slaps guide's wrist
A local tour company has been warned about pulling salmon out of the water so they can be photographed by tourists.

Alaska farms may lose organic label
Farmers in Alaska who began officially certifying their produce as organic last year are concerned they may lose that label if standards being considered by the federal government are approved.

POLICE AND FIRE
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported:

Improved sites see fewer campers
Usage is down at the U.S. Forest Service campground at Mendenhall Lake, but campers are happy with some recent improvements.

Panel named to reshape districts
A five-member board that will draw new legislative boundaries after the census has political, geographic and racial balance, according to observers.

Briefly

Drivers upset paving work is coating cars
Educator Zina Higgs got herself transferred to a Mendenhall Valley elementary school so she could avoid driving downtown. But when she returned from vacation last Wednesday, she couldn't avoid making the trip.

Trails to connect region by land, sea
Officials from around Southeast Alaska are planning a trail system that would link the region with land, sea and underwater routes.

City seeks stronger water rules
The city Community Development Department wants Juneau to develop rules to reduce the pollution and sediment that runs off land into streams and makes it difficult for fish to survive.

State ready for bids to fix Columbia
The state is about to ask for bids on an estimated $1.5 million worth of repairs to the ferry Columbia.

briefly

Trails to connect region by land, sea
Officials from around Southeast Alaska are planning a trail system that would link the region with land, sea and underwater routes.

CORRECTION

Man lands 17 years for pot operation
ANCHORAGE - A Wasilla marijuana-grower was sentenced Monday to 17 years in federal prison on money-laundering charges.

Kake seeks emergency funds to replace dam
Now that water is running from the taps in Kake again, town officials want to ensure they won't go dry.

State ready for bids to fix Columbia
The state is about to ask for bids on an estimated $1.5 million worth of repairs to the ferry Columbia.

Midnight search finds 1 boater dead, 1 alive
KETCHIKAN - One fisherman died but his partner was rescued early today after a search for a sinking boat in dense fog about 18 miles northwest of Ketchikan.

Improved sites see fewer campers
Usage is down at the U.S. Forest Service campground at Mendenhall Lake, but campers are happy with some recent improvements.

Man lands 17 years for pot operation
ANCHORAGE - A Wasilla marijuana-grower was sentenced Monday to 17 years in federal prison on money-laundering charges.

New scholarships available for students hoping to attend UAS
Faced with difficulty in filling its nursing positions during a nationwide shortage, Bartlett Regional Hospital is offering two scholarships to local college students.

School superintendent hired as independent contractor
ANCHORAGE - Schools Superintendent Bob Christal became an independent contractor instead of an employee under a precedent-setting move by the school board this week. Monday's decision allows Christal to increase his income by taking retirement pay at the same time.

Pat Pourchot to head state resource dept.
Pat Pourchot, legislative director for Gov. Tony Knowles, was appointed state commissioner of natural resources today.

POLICE AND FIRE
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported:

Alaska exports 11 percent more in first half of 2000
Alaska's exports for the first half of the year increased 11 percent compared to the same period last year, according to the governor's office.

briefly

Judge OKs COLA deal
WASHINGTON - A recent settlement over a cost-of-living dispute with the government means most of Alaska's federal workers won't get any back pay.

CORRECTION

New scholarships available for students hoping to attend UAS
Faced with difficulty in filling its nursing positions during a nationwide shortage, Bartlett Regional Hospital is offering two scholarships to local college students.

Kake seeks emergency funds to replace dam
Now that water is running from the taps in Kake again, town officials want to ensure they won't go dry.

State slaps guide's wrist
A local tour company has been warned about pulling salmon out of the water so they can be photographed by tourists.

Panel named to reshape districts
A five-member board that will draw new legislative boundaries after the census has political, geographic and racial balance, according to observers.

Midnight search finds 1 boater dead, 1 alive
KETCHIKAN - One fisherman died but his partner was rescued early today after a search for a sinking boat in dense fog about 18 miles northwest of Ketchikan.

Two men injured in plane crash
ANCHORAGE - Two men conducting research for the state Department of Fish and Game were injured Tuesday night when their plane crashed on the Alaska Peninsula about 50 miles northeast of Port Moller.

Pat Pourchot to head state resource dept.
Pat Pourchot, legislative director for Gov. Tony Knowles, was appointed state commissioner of natural resources today.

Scam suspect to change plea
ANCHORAGE - Anthony Kesler, the North Slope Borough's former chief of staff who is accused of running a phony charity, has asked to change his not-guilty plea, the Attorney General's office said Tuesday.

Alaska exports 11 percent more in first half of 2000
Alaska's exports for the first half of the year increased 11 percent compared to the same period last year, according to the governor's office.

School superintendent hired as independent contractor
ANCHORAGE - Schools Superintendent Bob Christal became an independent contractor instead of an employee under a precedent-setting move by the school board this week. Monday's decision allows Christal to increase his income by taking retirement pay at the same time.

Judge OKs COLA deal
WASHINGTON - A recent settlement over a cost-of-living dispute with the government means most of Alaska's federal workers won't get any back pay.

Bank funds UAS institute
First National Bank of Anchorage has given $96,000 to the University of Alaska Southeast to fund the first three years of a summer Student Leadership Institute.

POLICE AND FIRE
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported:

City seeks stronger water rules
The city Community Development Department wants Juneau to develop rules to reduce the pollution and sediment that runs off land into streams and makes it difficult for fish to survive.

Briefly

Two men injured in plane crash
ANCHORAGE - Two men conducting research for the state Department of Fish and Game were injured Tuesday night when their plane crashed on the Alaska Peninsula about 50 miles northeast of Port Moller.

Scam suspect to change plea
ANCHORAGE - Anthony Kesler, the North Slope Borough's former chief of staff who is accused of running a phony charity, has asked to change his not-guilty plea, the Attorney General's office said Tuesday.

Drivers upset paving work is coating cars
Educator Zina Higgs got herself transferred to a Mendenhall Valley elementary school so she could avoid driving downtown. But when she returned from vacation last Wednesday, she couldn't avoid making the trip.

Word of mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute and we reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. The number to call in 586-4636. Then press 8255 to leave your message.

Word of mouth
Word of Mouth gives readers a forum to express opinions on a variety of issues by telephone. Calls must be limited to one minute and we reserve the right to edit calls for clarity, length and libel. The number to call in 586-4636. Then press 8255 to leave your message.

Crossing the line of politics and religion
Sen. Joe Lieberman on Monday called the United States "the most religious country in the world." Some people in Bhutan or the Vatican might quibble with the ranking, but the general point is well taken: America is a country where faith flourishes. More than that, it's a country where many faiths flourish, usually without interfering with each other or with those who choose not to worship at all. Tolerance combined with religiousness, rather than religiousness alone, is what makes this country the envy of so many people around the world. And it's that spirit of tolerance that is endangered when politicians stray too far across a line that separates politics from religion. The line shifts from time to time; it is, inevitably and properly, ill-defined; but it matters a great deal nonetheless. It's our sense that Mr. Lieberman, Democratic candidate for vice president, has crossed it in recent days and though he's not the first to do so in this election year he ought to scurry back.

Word of mouth
Word of Mouth gives read

Keeping gas pipeline in state is best option
The following editorial appeared in last Wednesday's edition of the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner:

Why a grand jury is needed for Clinton
On the eve of Vice President Al Gore's acceptance speech, the Associated Press reported that this office had impaneled a grand jury to consider criminal charges against President Clinton. Public voices from across the political spectrum stampeded to condemn this office for leaking the story to serve improper, partisan purposes. The next day a federal judge on the three-judge panel that oversees this office acknowledged responsibility for the leak. Many who so quickly rushed to judgment realized their error and have now reconsidered their evaluation of this office, for which I am grateful.

Keeping gas pipeline in state is best option
The following editorial appeared in last Wednesday's edition of the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner:

A proper wlecome
Being new to Alaska, I decided that Monday would be a great day for photo opportunities and who knows, maybe my first bear.

Demanding service from starved agencies
We have become a spoiled nation with zero tolerance for forest fires, tires that fail, pla

Real Alaskans won't hesitate to reject a road
Proof that Juneau is a dysfunctional political town was delivered when the assembly voted to add an advisory question regarding access to the local ballot this fall. Great! We will now debate a topic and vote on an issue that is meaningless.

Parties set on giving states a leg up -- but not a crutch
One rare point of agreement between the political parties these days is that the states should take the lead in delivering social services. Vice President Al Gore has structured almost all of his major initiatives -- from plans to provide health insurance for working-poor adults to a proposal for universal access to preschool -- as grants that leave states great leeway to design their own programs. George W. Bush takes a similar tack and, in some areas, would go much further: He wants to consolidate dozens of existing federal education programs into broad grants that states could more freely spend as they choose.

Demanding service from starved agencies
We have become a spoiled nation with zero tolerance for forest fires, tires that fail, pla

Why a grand jury is needed for Clinton
On the eve of Vice President Al Gore's acceptance speech, the Associated Press reported that this office had impaneled a grand jury to consider criminal charges against President Clinton. Public voices from across the political spectrum stampeded to condemn this office for leaking the story to serve improper, partisan purposes. The next day a federal judge on the three-judge panel that oversees this office acknowledged responsibility for the leak. Many who so quickly rushed to judgment realized their error and have now reconsidered their evaluation of this office, for which I am grateful.

Word of mouth
Word of Mouth gives read

Parties set on giving states a leg up -- but not a crutch
One rare point of agreement between the political parties these days is that the states should take the lead in delivering social services. Vice President Al Gore has structured almost all of his major initiatives -- from plans to provide health insurance for working-poor adults to a proposal for universal access to preschool -- as grants that leave states great leeway to design their own programs. George W. Bush takes a similar tack and, in some areas, would go much further: He wants to consolidate dozens of existing federal education programs into broad grants that states could more freely spend as they choose.

A proper wlecome
Being new to Alaska, I decided that Monday would be a great day for photo opportunities and who knows, maybe my first bear.

Real Alaskans won't hesitate to reject a road
Proof that Juneau is a dysfunctional political town was delivered when the assembly voted to add an advisory question regarding access to the local ballot this fall. Great! We will now debate a topic and vote on an issue that is meaningless.

Crossing the line of politics and religion
Sen. Joe Lieberman on Monday called the United States "the most religious country in the world." Some people in Bhutan or the Vatican might quibble with the ranking, but the general point is well taken: America is a country where faith flourishes. More than that, it's a country where many faiths flourish, usually without interfering with each other or with those who choose not to worship at all. Tolerance combined with religiousness, rather than religiousness alone, is what makes this country the envy of so many people around the world. And it's that spirit of tolerance that is endangered when politicians stray too far across a line that separates politics from religion. The line shifts from time to time; it is, inevitably and properly, ill-defined; but it matters a great deal nonetheless. It's our sense that Mr. Lieberman, Democratic candidate for vice president, has crossed it in recent days and though he's not the first to do so in this election year he ought to scurry back.

Sports in Juneau

Sports in Juneau

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