This Day in History

Posted: Wednesday, September 24, 2008

In Alaska, in the Nation and the World

In Alaska

• In 1794, eight monks from the Russian Orthodox Church reached Kodiak, founding their faith in North America.

• In 1917, the Katmai National Monument, in Southwestern Alaska, was established with a proclamation by President Woodrow Wilson.

• In 1924, a fire destroyed a large part of the business district of Tanana.

• In 1934, a single-engine biplane took off from Cordova in the first flight of Cordova Airlines.

• In 1949, Pan American World Airways resumed the world's longest aerial "milk run." Twice a week, it flew 2,191 miles from Seattle to Nome carrying 120 pounds of fresh milk for free distribution to Nome children.

• In 1979, the Southeast Alaska Conservation Council filed a lawsuit against the state, charging that a recent timber sale endangered the eagle habitat in the Chilkat Valley near Haines.

In the nation

• In 1789, Congress passed a Judiciary Act which provided for an attorney general and a Supreme Court.

• In 1869, thousands of businessmen were ruined in a Wall Street panic known as "Black Friday" after financiers Jay Gould and James Fisk attempted to corner the gold market.

• In 1929, Lt. James H. Doolittle guided a Consolidated NY-2 Biplane over Mitchel Field in New York in the first all-instrument flight.

• In 1955, President Eisenhower suffered a heart attack while on vacation in Denver.

• In 1958, "The Donna Reed Show" premiered on ABC-TV.

• In 1960, the USS Enterprise, the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, was launched at Newport News, Va.

• In 1968, the TV news magazine "60 Minutes" premiered on CBS; the undercover police drama "The Mod Squad" premiered on ABC.

• In 1976, Patricia Hearst was sentenced to seven years in prison for her part in a 1974 bank robbery in San Francisco carried out by the Symbionese Liberation Army. (She was released after 22 months after receiving clemency from President Carter.)

• In 1988, members of the eastern Massachusetts Episcopal diocese elected Barbara C. Harris the first female bishop in the church's history.

• In 1998, the government began releasing the new, harder-to-counterfeit $20 bill.

• In 2003, after four turbulent months, three special legislative sessions and two Democratic walkouts, both houses of the Republican-controlled Texas Legislature adopted redistricting plans favoring the GOP. The top candidates vying to replace California Gov. Gray Davis joined in a lively debate.

• In 2007, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad questioned the official version of the Sept. 11 attacks and defended the right to cast doubt on the Holocaust in a tense appearance at Columbia University in New York. United Auto Workers walked off the job at GM plants in the first nationwide strike during auto contract negotiations since 1976; a tentative pact ended the walkout two days later.

In the world

• In 1963, the U.S. Senate ratified a treaty with Britain and the Soviet Union limiting nuclear testing.

• In 1988, Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson won the men's 100-meter dash at the Seoul Summer Olympics - but he was disqualified three days later for using anabolic steroids.



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