This Day in History

Posted: Friday, November 25, 2005

In Alaska

• In 1912, the name of the post office at the smelter town of Port Hadley, on Prince of Wales Island, was changed to Hadley.

• In 1969, the greatest deluge of mail to Gov. Keith Miller, more than 700 letters, hit the governor's desk in Juneau following a televised documentary supposedly showing wolves being hunted for bounty.

• In 1970, Walter J. Hickel was fired from his job as secretary of the Interior by Richard M. Nixon. He was appointed to the post in January, 1969.

• In 1974, a recount was begun of the 90,000 votes cast for governor. Prior to the recount, Jay Hammond led Gov. William Egan by 365 votes.

In the nation

• In 1758, in the French and Indian War, the British captured Fort Duquesne in present-day Pittsburgh.

• In 1783, the British evacuated New York, their last military position in the United States during the Revolutionary War.

• In 1963, the body of President Kennedy was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery.

• In 1985, Ronald W. Pelton, a former employee of the National Security Agency, was arrested on espionage charges. (Pelton was later convicted of selling secrets to Soviet agents.)

• In 1999, 5-year-old Elian Gonzalez was rescued by a pair of sport fishermen off Florida, setting off an international custody battle between relatives in Miami and Elian's father in Cuba.

• In 2002, President Bush signed legislation creating the Department of Homeland Security, and appointed Tom Ridge to be its head.

• In 1995, in his weekly radio address, President Clinton appealed to America's values and interests as he pleaded for support for the Bosnia peace agreement.

• In 2000, hundreds of military veterans and retirees, angered by the rejection of overseas absentee ballots in Florida, held a noisy demonstration in Pensacola, one of several rallies Republicans and Democrats staged across Florida.

In the world

• In 1973, Greek President George Papadopoulos was ousted in a bloodless military coup.

• In 1995, Serbs in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo took to the streets by the thousands to protest the peace plan, vowing to fight to the death.

• In 2004, leading Sunni Muslim politicians in Iraq urged postponement of the Jan. 30, 2005, national elections. The elections ended up taking place as scheduled. A man with a knife broke into a high school dormitory in Ruzhou, China, killing nine boys as they slept. Chinese authorities later executed a 21-year-old man who confessed to the attack.



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