Tuesday, December 2, 2003

Steaming mad at airport cup policy
On Oct. 31, 2003, I left for Montana on a family trip. It was quite early in the morning and so I decided I'd get a Chai tea to wake myself up. Just before our plane was boarding we headed for security. The security guard told me I couldn't go through because the cup containing my tea was plastic, so I would either have to stand there and drink all of it or go back downstairs to put it in a paper cup.

Praise for wolf ruling
We applaud Superior Court Judge Sharon Gleason's decision temporarily halting aerial wolf killing until its necessity and legality are evaluated fairly and without prejudice in a court of law.

For Skagway, fast ferries are the safest
I fine it odd that recent letter writers discuss Whitehorse crime without knowing anything about it. There is crime in Whitehorse - probably more than in Juneau - because there are many more people in the Yukon out of work.

Too much too fast
Senator Murkowski's 70-page Alaska Land Transfer Acceleration Act of 2003 (S.1466) would substantially change the rules by which national forest and national wildlife refuge lands are transferred out of public ownership. The bill would also authorize the Secretary of Interior to open or close certain federal lands to various uses without providing an opportunity for public notice, public comment, environmental review or judicial review.

Not trying to imitate B.C. ferry system
Recent headlines incorrectly stated that the Marine Transportation Advisory Board (MTAB) proposed privatizing the ferry system and modeling the Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS) after the British Columbia (B.C.) ferry system. As the chair of MTAB I feel the need to set the record straight.

Don't understand oil deal
Governor Murkowski has stated numerous times that resource development will solve our budget crisis. If that is so, I do not understand why senators Ted Stevens and Lisa Murkowski added an amendment to the National Energy Bill that will eliminate both the federal and state payment of oil royalties from any oil coming out of NPR-A.

The criminals are here
Once again someone thinks my concerns are about the criminal element in Haines and Skagway. Look at Juneau's population, people. The criminals are here.

Partner coverage is not a religious issue
I would like to respond to Mr. Westad's letter concerning domestic partnership benefits as passed by the Juneau Assembly. The city of Juneau, or any other, is a government institution and not a religious institution. The U.S. Constitution separates the two entities. One makes civil law and the other makes religious law. The issue of domestic partner benefits is a civil law with civil rights implications.

Credit where it's due
Thank you for your recent article highlighting the computer program Fast ForWord that the Juneau School District has implemented to assist children in learning. We are the parents of Thane Reishus-O'Brien, one of the children featured in the article. The reporter, however, did not include the credit Thane's classroom teacher also deserves.

Police & Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported:

Around Town
Today Low-Impact Exercise, 10 a.m., Juneau Senior Center and Valley Senior Center. Details: 463-6175.

Alaska eaglets California-bound
Scaling a 100-foot Sitka spruce and then perching at the edge of an eagle's nest, Jim Spickler's job is only half done. He speaks to the 8-week-old raptors in the nest, just long enough to coax them into a padded nylon bag and make the descent.

Panel shaping survey on possible dog restrictions
Capital Kennel Club of Juneau opposes dog-free areas or any other increased regulations, club representative Sue McGregor told the Dog Task Force on Monday. The kennel club's position comes as the task force is working on a survey to the community about how to solve dog and open space issues.

Photo: O, the weather outside
Chris Siddon breaks up icy snow as he digs his car out Sunday afternoon at the corner of Indian and Seventh

City committee eyes funds for new arts center
The Juneau Assembly's Committee of the Whole agreed Monday to consider funding $25,000 toward the first performing arts center in Juneau.

This Day in History
In Alaska:• In 1894, the Yukon Order of Pioneers was organized at Forty Mile on the Yukon River. • In 1935, the University of Alaska Library at Fairbanks moved into the new library/gymnasium building. It took 13 hours to move 12,000 books.

Around Town
Today: Valley Toastmasters meeting, 6:10 a.m. every Tuesday, Henry's. Details: Jim, 789-3074. Sewing Circle, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Valley Senior Center. Details: Betty, 789-7236.

Bill Spear: Going his way
Alaska had been a state for less than a decade in 1968. The Trans-Alaska pipeline wouldn't be completed for another nine years. And William Spear interviewed in a Kansas City airport for a job he would take as an assistant attorney general under Alaska Gov. Walter Hickel.

Police & Fire
Juneau police, fire officials and state troopers reported:

This Day in History
In Alaska: • In 1903, the B.M. Behrends Mercantile Company was incorporated in Juneau. • In 1959, Phil Holdsworth, then commissioner of natural resources, said "We'll flood the Bureau of Land Management with applications in the next six months," as the state increased the pace of acquiring the 104 million acres of land granted by the Statehood Act.

White Gold
The heavy snowfall that hit Juneau over the weekend may have provided gnarly powder for shredding down The Face run at Eaglecrest Ski Area, but to those who operate the facility, it's white gold.

Photo: Douglas minister, 1918
This photograph, taken in 1918, shows the Rev. O.B. Whitmore next to a waterfall in the Juneau-Douglas area.

Searchers locate two lost hunters
Local rescue teams found two deer hunters who became separated from their partners this weekend in the wilderness.

NorQuest to stop canning humpies
NorQuest Seafoods won't can pink salmon next season, a move that affects about 15 seiners in Southeast and hits on the broader question of markets for struggling salmon fishermen.

Mary Ellen Zylinski
Former Juneau resident Mary Ellen Zylinski, 73, died Nov. 19, 2003, at St. Mary's Medical Center in Duluth, Minn.

Proposal to privatize some ferry services a concern
Some of the ideas presented to Governor Murkowski's Marine Transportation Advisory Board (MTAB) last week are disturbing, especially an idea to use B.C. Ferries Inc. as a model for an improved Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS).

My turn: No thanks, no need for false motivation of 'school spirit'
No thanks, I don't want your school spirit and have no intention of showing my own. I'm tired of school spirit. I'm sick of clapping and screaming. I'm sick of pep rallies. I'm sick of JDHS sweatshirts and fake enthusiasm for a school when truthfully any logic behind school spirit eludes me.

Sports in Juneau
UPCOMING EVENTS Saturday, Dec. 6 • 10th annual Jingle Jog - The 10th annual Jingle Jog, a 5-kilometer run or 1-mile walk, will be held on Saturday, Dec. 6, at 10 a.m. Check in at 9 a.m. at the parking lot of JRC/The Alaska Club's Mendenhall Valley location.

Freshman phenom
As a freshman on the University of Bridgeport volleyball team, Amy Neussl hoped to get on the floor. She ended up doing a whole lot more.

Sports in Juneau
UPCOMING EVENTS: Saturday, Dec. 6 • 10th annual Jingle Jog - The 10th annual Jingle Jog, a 5-kilometer run or 1-mile walk, will be held on Saturday, Dec. 6, at 10 a.m. Check in at 9 a.m. at the parking lot of JRC/The Alaska Club's Mendenhall Valley location. Cost is $10 in advance or $12 day-of-race for adults, and $3 for kids. Pre-registration is available at JRC/The Alaska Club.

Skagwayan on Syracuse football team
Stan Bush of Skagway went to Syracuse University to learn how to be a sportscaster. He didn't expect to write his own "Rudy" story.

Haines man competes in heartthrob contest
Luke Hedrick of Haines has stood up to the judgment of Harvard admissions counselors. But that may be a breeze compared to what he'll face next year: the whims of 14-year-old girls.

KPC cleanup nearly complete
It's been nearly seven years since Ketchikan Pulp Co. closed its It's been nearly seven years since Ketchikan Pulp Co. closed its pulp mill and four years since it last hauled timber off the Tongass National Forest, and the cleanup of sites contaminated by the company's logging operations is nearly complete.pulp mill and four years since it last hauled timber off the Tongass National Forest, and the cleanup of sites contaminated by the company's logging operations is nearly complete.

National economic growth could be good for Alaska
FAIRBANKS - Alaska's oil-dependent economy is less diverse than the nation's as a whole, but recent national growth could still carry good tidings for the state this holiday season and beyond, according to economists.

Alaska Digest
staff and Wire reports

Hovercraft delivers to the Alaska Bush
ANCHORAGE - Each year, Glen Van Valin and his crew wait for a good stretch of nice, cold weather to descend on the Bethel area - cold enough to freeze the muddy waters of the Kuskokwim River into a wide open, frosty-white freeway.

Petersburg Pilot publishers purchase Wrangell Sentinel
The Petersburg Pilot and the Wrangell Sentinel, two weekly newspapers serving central Southeast Alaska, are now under the same ownership.

Alaska Digest
staff and Wire reports

Anchorage parks rank high among 6 other cities
ANCHORAGE - Anchorage's parks are getting high marks from consultants hired to help update the city's parks plan. The consultants compared municipal parks here with those in six other cities: Boise, Idaho ; Boulder, Colo.; Duluth, Minn.; Portland, Ore.; Spokane, Wash.; and Vancouver, B.C.

Scientists: Did industrial whaling cause sea-otter decline?
GRANTS PASS, Ore. - A cascading decline in seal, sea lion and sea otter populations in the North Pacific may have been triggered by industrial whaling after World War II that forced killer whales to look for new sources of food, a group of scientists suggests.

Lawmakers consider stricter regs for under-21 strip clubs
ANCHORAGE - Looking back on her 19 years, BobbyLee Castoe says one year of stripping for a living was worse than multiple years in and out of the McLaughlin Youth Center, a juvenile jail.

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